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TILLOTSON COLLEGE

Tillotson College
Tillotson College ca. 1881
Lawrence T. Jones III Texas Photographs,
DeGolyer Library, Central University Libraries,
Southern Methodist University

TILLOTSON COLLEGE. Tillotson College in Austin, a senior college for blacks built and maintained by the American Missionary Society of Congregational churches, was chartered in 1877 and named for George Jeffrey Tillotson, who planned the school, selected the site, and raised $16,000 for its establishment. Called Tillotson Collegiate and Normal Institute, it opened on January 17, 1881, with 250 students, chiefly in the lower grades. Allen Hall was the first building; Beard Hall was constructed in 1894; in 1947 there were fourteen buildings on a campus of twenty-three acres. William E. Brooks, first president (1881–85), was succeeded by John Hershaw (1886), Henry L. Lubbell (1886–1889), William M. Brown (1889–93), Winfield S. Goss (1894–95), Marshall R. Gaines (1896–1904), Arthur W. Partch (1905–06), Isaac M. Agard (1907–18), and Francis W. Fletcher (1919–23). J. T. Hodges, the first African American to be president (1924–29), was followed by Mary E. Branch (1930–44) and William H. Jones, who became president in 1944. In 1925 the school was recognized as a junior college. It became a woman's college in 1926, and enrollment dropped to 130 in 1930. In 1931 the high school was dropped, and senior college standing was achieved. Coeducation was restored in 1935, and in 1943 the college was granted an "A" rating by the Southern Association of Colleges. In 1946 enrollment was 650 for the long session, and the faculty numbered thirty-five. Three degrees were offered: B.A., B.S., and B.S. in Home Economics. On October 24, 1952, Tillotson College officially merged with Samuel Huston College to form Huston-Tillotson College.

 

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

"TILLOTSON COLLEGE," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/kbt27), accessed October 22, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Modified on June 5, 2013. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.