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MIDLOTHIAN COLLEGE

MIDLOTHIAN COLLEGE. Midlothian College, in Midlothian, began operation in 1884. William Wesley Works, principal of the Midlothian schools, was the founder. After a controversy with the school patrons, Works founded a private school in 1892, known as the Polytechnic Institute. The institute was in the northern portion of town at the site of present Kimmel Park. Will Price and his brothers and associates were commissioned to build a structure that would house the city's private boarding school. The basic design of the school was laid out by Works. The institute offered elementary and high school work and the study of fine arts, particularly music. Works remained president until his death in 1895. Around 1898 the Polytechnic Institute was renamed Whitten's Institute, after a new president. In 1900, after Whitten left, the name became Midlothian College. The physical plant burned in 1893 and was replaced by a larger structure on the same site. Because of financial problems the college struggled until it was consolidated with the Midlothian public schools in 1903, at which time the building became known as Midlothian Primary School. In 1908 the neglected building of Midlothian College was dismantled. Part of it was used to extend a residence. On October 2, 1976, an official state historical marker was placed at the site.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Mary Florence Bryan, The History of Education in Ellis County (M.A. thesis, University of Texas, 1930). Edna Davis Hawkins, et al., History of Ellis County, Texas (Waco: Texian, 1972). Memorial and Biographical History of Ellis County (Chicago: Lewis, 1892; rpt., as Ellis County History, Fort Worth: Historical Publishers, 1972). Midlothian Mirror, August 28, 1986.

Jeffrey Pilchiek

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Jeffrey Pilchiek, "MIDLOTHIAN COLLEGE," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/kcm07), accessed December 29, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.