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TEXAS STATE TECHNICAL COLLEGE-AMARILLO

TEXAS STATE TECHNICAL COLLEGE-AMARILLO. The Texas State Technical Institute opened a campus in Amarillo in September 1970 with 147 students and seven programs of study. The campus was located east of the Amarillo International Airport and was a residential school. Enrollment on the Mid-Continent Campus, Amarillo, was 1,083 in 1974. In 1991 the school's name was changed to Texas State Technical College-Amarillo. There were five divisions: Academic and Remedial; Engineering/Manufacturing; Electronic Related Technologies; Information and Design; and Transportation. The school held accreditations and memberships with the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, and the Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers. In 1991 there were 600 students enrolled each quarter in nineteen programs of study. An additional 6,200 students participated in the Economic Development and Industrial Training Program, which served the territory ranging from Lubbock to Wichita Falls and provided adult and continuing education, apprenticeship training, and industrial startup and expansion. The associate in applied science degree and the certificate of completion were offered. The Texas State Technical College-Amarillo worked in conjunction with area secondary schools to develop a common curriculum for vocational training. It also worked with the West Texas State University College of Business to provide training toward a bachelor of science degree in engineering technology. Ron DeSpain was president of the school, which had a faculty of sixty-five.

Nancy Beck Young

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Nancy Beck Young, "TEXAS STATE TECHNICAL COLLEGE-AMARILLO," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/kctqz), accessed August 29, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.