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UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS SYSTEM

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS SYSTEM. The University of Texas System, established by the Texas Constitution in 1876, consisted of nine academic universities, six health institutions, and UT System administration in 2004. UT System institutions enrolled a total of 182,752 students in fall 2004 making it one of the largest systems of higher education in the nation.

Although each institution has its own unique mission, history, culture, goals, and objectives, all UT System campuses share an overarching mission to provide high-quality educational opportunities for the enhancement of the human resources of Texas, the nation, and the world. Enrollment at UT System academic institutions represents more than one-third of the total for Texas public universities. Fall 2004 enrollment figures show that more than one-third of UT System students are of Hispanic or African-American heritage.

In 2004 the University of Texas at Austin, the largest institution in the UT System, maintained an enrollment of approximately 50,000 students. The University of Texas at Austin McDonald Observatory at Mount Locke and the University of Texas at Austin Marine Science Institute in Port Aransas were part of the system. Other academic institutions in the UT System were the University of Texas at Arlington, the University of Texas at Brownsville, the University of Texas at Dallas, the University of Texas at El Paso, the University of Texas-Pan American in Edinburg, the University of Texas of the Permian Basin in Odessa, the University of Texas at Tyler, and the University of Texas at San Antonio,qqv which also included the University of Texas Institute of Texan Cultures in San Antonio.

The health science centers, the cancer center, and the nursing school were organized in October 1972 to coordinate university-wide programs in specific health areas. Under the administrative control of each of these three medical units were several individual institutions. In 2004 there were six health institutions of the UT System. Among these were the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, including the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School at Dallas, the University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Science at Dallas, and the University of Texas School of Allied Health Sciences at Dallas; the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, including the University of Texas Medical School at Galveston, the University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Galveston, the University of Texas School of Allied Health Sciences at Galveston, the University of Texas Marine Biomedical Institute at Galveston, the University of Texas Institute for the Medical Humanities at Galveston, and the University of Texas Medical Branch Hospitals at Galveston; the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, including the University of Texas Medical School at Houston, the University of Texas Dental Branch at Houston, the University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, the University of Texas School of Allied Health Sciences at Houston, the University of Texas School of Public Health, the University of Texas Mental Sciences Institute, and the University of Texas Speech and Hearing Institute at Houston; and the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, including the University of Texas Medical School at San Antonio, the University of Texas Dental School at San Antonio, and the University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at San Antonio. The University of Texas Health Center at Tyler provided medical care to East Texas residents, as well as research and training for physicians. The University of Texas System Cancer Center was composed of the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center at Houston and the University of Texas Environmental Science Parkqqv in Bastrop. The six nursing schools within the University of Texas System, formerly known as the University of Texas System Nursing School, included the University of Texas at Austin School of Nursing, the University of Texas School of Nursing at Arlington, the University of Texas School of Nursing at El Paso, the University of Texas School of Nursing at Galveston, the University of Texas School of Nursing at Houston, and the University of Texas School of Nursing at San Antonio. They share a mission of education, clinical care, research, and community service. Enrollment at UT System health institutions represents nearly three-quarters of the total for Texas health institutions.

With 87,000 employees, the UT System is one of the largest employers in Texas. UT academic and health institutions are among the key economic drivers of the state in numerous areas, including employment and education of a workforce prepared to meet the challenges of the 21st century. UT System institutions spent $1.54 billion on research leading to inventions, innovations, patents, and groundbreaking health care initiatives.

A nine-member board of regents governs the UT System. The regents are selected from different parts of the state, appointed by the governor, and confirmed by the senate for six-year terms. Past regents of the University of Texas System have included Frank C. Erwin, Jr.; Joe T. Nelson; Frank N. Ikard; Edward A. Clark; and John Robert Peace.qqv The University of Texas System has used both presidential and chancellorship forms of administration. Past heads of the system have included Logan Wilson and Harry Huntt Ransom.qqv In 2002, Mark G. Yudof was appointed chancellor, the ninth person to hold this position since it was created in 1950. See also PERMANENT UNIVERSITY FUND.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

The University of Texas System Website (http://www.utsystem.edu), accessed Feb. 3, 2005.

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

"UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS SYSTEM," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/kcu40), accessed September 15, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.