Members Only Area
Bookmark and Share
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

TEXAS BUREAU OF IMMIGRATION

TEXAS BUREAU OF IMMIGRATION. The Constitution of 1869 made provision for a special agency with "the purpose of promoting and protecting immigration" into the state. Enabling legislation that was passed on May 23, 1871, directed the governor to appoint a superintendent with a four-year term to administer this Bureau of Immigration. He was empowered to use tax revenues to write material describing Texas as a destination for the immigrant and to appoint paid agents and volunteer lecturers to travel to southern and northern states as well as to Europe, to encourage potential immigrants to seek land in Texas. Gustav Loeffler served as the first superintendent until 1874, when Governor Richard Coke appointed Jerome Bonaparte Robertson to that position. Fiscal retrenchment incorporated in the Constitution of 1876 brought an end to the bureau, as the constitution included a specific prohibition against using state funds "for any purpose of bringing immigrants to the State." While the bureau existed, its superintendents negotiated with transportation companies to help bring immigrants into the state and published such enticement literature as the pamphlet "Texas, the Home for the Emigrant, From Everywhere."

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Hans Peter Nielsen Gammel, comp., Laws of Texas, 1822–1897 (10 vols., Austin: Gammel, 1898).

Barbara J. Rozek

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Barbara J. Rozek, "TEXAS BUREAU OF IMMIGRATION," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/mdtlp), accessed December 21, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.