Bookmark and Share
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

NORTH CROTON CREEK

NORTH CROTON CREEK. North Croton Creek rises (at 33°29' N, 100°33' W) eleven miles northeast of Gilpin in southeastern Dickens County and runs southeast for seventy miles, passing through southeastern Dickens, western and southern King, and southeastern Stonewall counties before reaching its mouth on the Brazos River (at 33°23' N, 100°00' W), in the Katz oilfield in the northeastern corner of Stonewall County. The area surrounding the creek basin is made up of isolated ranchland and oilfields. The stream is intermittent in its upper reaches, but begins continual flow in south central King County. The local terrain of moderate to steep slopes with locally high relief is surfaced by clay, sandy, and silt loams that support juniper, cacti, mesquite, and grasses. A variety of stories exist regarding the name of the creek, among them that it was named for a nineteenth-century Indian tribe; for an early settler; for a laxative known as Croton Oil (since drinking the water seemed to have the same effect); or for the reputed bitter taste of the creek water.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Fred Arrington, A History of Dickens County: Ranches and Rolling Plains (Quanah, Texas: Nortex, 1971). Dickens County Historical Commission, Dickens County: Its Land and Its People (Lubbock: Craftsman Printers, 1986).

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

"NORTH CROTON CREEK," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/rbn32), accessed October 31, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.

T