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LAKE FRYER

LAKE FRYER. Lake Fryer, originally known as Wolf Creek Lake, was formed by the construction of an earthen dam on Wolf Creek in eastern Ochiltree County (at 31°46' N, 95°42' W). After the county purchased the site, construction on the dam was begun in 1938 by the Panhandle Water Conservation Authority. M. P. Exline was project manager, and Richard Marsh was chief engineer. About 200 people were employed, and funds were obtained from several federal government sources, including the Public Works and Works Progress administrations (see WORK PROJECTS ADMINISTRATION). Twice during construction the rising creek threatened the partially built fill, but work crews were able to prevent any damage. The dam was completed by the late summer of 1940. During the next few years Wolf Creek Lake was used primarily for soil conservation, flood control, and recreation. In 1947 a flash flood washed away the dam, but during the 1950s congressman Walter Rogers secured a deed to the county from the federal government in order to rebuild. After a bond election to obtain local funds, the dam was rebuilt in 1957, with M. J. Wolfrum as project engineer. The reservoir was named Lake Fryer after James T. Fryer, an area pioneer rancher. During the 1980s the lake and the surrounding park were owned and operated by Ochiltree County and included a Girl Scout camp and other recreational facilities. Abundant evidence of occupation by prehistoric people near Lake Fryer has been unearthed in a buried Pueblo city.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Gunnar Brune, Springs of Texas, Vol. 1 (Fort Worth: Branch-Smith, 1981). Wheatheart of the Plains: An Early History of Ochiltree County (Perryton, Texas: Ochiltree County Historical Survey Committee, 1969).

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

"LAKE FRYER," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/rolaj), accessed September 16, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.