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WILLIAM BEAUMONT ARMY MEDICAL CENTER

WILLIAM BEAUMONT ARMY MEDICAL CENTER. The William Beaumont Army Medical Center, at Fort Bliss, was known as William Beaumont General Hospital when it opened on July 1, 1921. At that time the hospital, constructed at a cost of $1.6 million, consisted of thirty-seven buildings and had a normal bed capacity of 403. The hospital was on a 120-acre tract just west of Fort Bliss and served as the post hospital. After the construction of a new base hospital, it continued to serve Fort Bliss for special cases and also served Biggs Field, Fort Huachuca, Fort D. A. Russell, Luke Field, the Tucson Air Base, Camp Barkeley, and Albuquerque Air Base. By 1937 the hospital had been expanded to seventy buildings, and in 1941 it opened a School for Medical Department Technicians. During World War II the hospital received particular recognition for its work in plastic surgery. The hospital was named for William Beaumont, a nineteenth century army physician who pioneered the study of the human digestive process. A new $17.5 million, twelve-story building was dedicated on July 1, 1972, and in 1973, when it became a teaching hospital, the name of the facility was changed to William Beaumont Army Medical Center. The three-story Bradley Building, named for Gen. Omar Bradley, was added in 1982. William Beaumont Army Medical Center has a capacity of 600 beds; employs 1,500 military and 700 civilian personnel; and serves all of West Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and part of southern California. It has one of only two trauma units in the El Paso area.

Martin Donell Kohout

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Martin Donell Kohout, "WILLIAM BEAUMONT ARMY MEDICAL CENTER," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/sbw05), accessed December 18, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.