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October 2011

Refugio Benavides, Atanacio Vidaurri, Cristobal Benavides, and John Z. Leyendeck
Vol No.: 
CXV

Refugio Benavides, Atanacio Vidaurri, Cristobal Benavides, and John Z. Leyendecker, Confederate officers from Laredo, Texas. UTSA’s Institute of Texan Cultures, 072-3258, Courtesy St. Mary’s University Archives (San Antonio, Texas). In this month’s issue of the Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Alex Mendoza examines the complex factors that shaped the loyalties of Tejano soldiers from Laredo, such as the Benavides brothers pictured here, in his article, “For Our Own Best Interests”: Nineteenth-Century
Laredo Tejanos, Military Service, and the Development of American Nationalism.”

 

Table of Contents: 

 Contents

“FOR OUR OWN BEST INTERESTS”: NINETEENTH-CENTURY LAREDO TEJANOS, MILITARY SERVICE, AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF AMERICAN NATIONALISM
By Alex Mendoza
CONQUERING THE HEARTS OF THE PEOPLE: LYNDON JOHNSON, C. VANN WOODWARD, AND “THE IRONY OF SOUTHERN HISTORY”
By Mitchell Lerner

NOTES AND DOCUMENTS

FROM THE JOURNAL OF WILLIAM SHIRLEY DAY: HIS JOURNEY FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM TO TEXAS IN 1881
By Chris Weaving

Southwestern Collection

Book Reviews

Monte Akers, The Accidental Historian: Tales of Trash and Treasure. 
BY DAN K. UTLEY

Richard C. Rattenbury, Arena Legacy: The Heritage of American Rodeo.
BY RICHARD W. SLATTA

Bobby D. Weaver, Oilfield Trash: Life and Labor in the Oil Patch.
BY KAY GOLDMAN

James R. Woodall, Texas Aggie Medals of Honor.
BY WILLIAM MCWHORTER

Michael Dregli, ed., Greetings from Route 66: The Ultimate Road Trip Back through Time along America’s Main Street.
BY PETER B. DEDEK

Melodie Cuate, Journey to La Salle’s Settlement.
BY DEBORAH BLOYS HARDIN

George Harwood Phillips, Vineyards and Vaqueros: Indian Labor and the Economic Expansion of Southern California, 1771–1877.
BY STACEY L. SMITH

Shirley Boteler Mock, Dreaming with the Ancestors: Black Seminole Women in Texas and Mexico. 
BY WILLIAM M. CLEMENTS

Craig Miner, A Most Magnificent Machine: America Adopts the Railroad, 1825–1862.
BY MARSHALL SCHOTT

Tom Reilly, War with Mexico! America’s Reporters Cover the Battlefront.
BY LANCE R. BLYTH

Stephen L. Moore, Volume IV 1842–1845: Rangers, Riflemen, and Indian Wars in Texas.
BY JODY EDWARD GINN

David McDonald, José Antonio Navarro: In Search of the American Dream in Nineteenth-Century Texas.
BY JAMES E. CRISP

Santiago Tafolla, A Life Crossing Borders: Memoir of a Mexican-American Confderate/Las memoria de un meixanoamerica en la Conferación.
BY JERRY THOMPSON

Richard F. Selcer and Kevin S. Foster, Written in Blood: The History of Fort Worth’s Fallen Lawmen,, Volume 1, 1861–1909.
BY ROBIN C. SAGER

James M. Smallwood, Kenneth W. Howell, and Carol C. Taylor, The Devil’s Triangle: Ben Bickerstaff, Northeast Texans, and the War of Reconstruction in Texas.
BY JAMES A. HATCHCOCK

Kimberly Harper, White Man’s Heaven: The Lynching and Expulsion of Blacks in the Southern Ozarks, 1894–1909.
BY BRANDON JETT

Nellie Witt Spikes, As a Farm Woman Thinks: Life and Land on the Texas High Plains, 1890–1960.
BY T. LINDSAY BAKER

Judith N. McArthur and Harold L. Smith., Texas through Women’s Eyes: The Twentieth-Century Experience.
BY JESSICA R. PLILEY

Charles S. Martin, Benching Jim Crow: The Rise and Fall of the Color Line in Southern College Sports, 1890 –1980. 
BY JORGE IBER

Neil Foley, Quest for Equality: The Failed Promise of Black-Brown Solidarity.
BY CYTHNIA OROZCO

William S. Clayson, Freedom is Not Enough: The War on Poverty and the Civil Rights Movement in Texas.
BY MARY C. BRENNAN

Elizabeth B. Murfee and Jack L. August Jr., Play by Play: Phoenix and Building the Herberger Theater.

BY JOHN AKERS