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April 2014

Vol No.: 
CXVII

Cover : A man piles mesquite for burning at El Indio, Texas, in this
1939 photography by Russell Lee. Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information Black-and-White Negatives, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. In “Marvelous, Maligned, and Misunderstood: The Strange History of the Mesquite Tree in Texas,” Jason E. Pierce recounts Texans’ ambivalent relationship with this plant, which has been seen as both an essential part of the Texas landscape and an invasive pest.

Table of Contents: 

MARVELOUS, MALIGNED, AND MISUNDERSTOOD: THE STRANGE HISTORY OF THE MESQUITE TREE IN TEXAS
       By Jason E. Pierce

THE CAPTIVITY OF MACARIO LEAL: A TEJANO AMONG THE COMANCHES, 1847–1854
       Edited and Translated by Joaquín Rivaya-Martínez

NOTES AND DOCUMENTS

SAM HOUSTON RETURNS? TWO LETTERS FROM TEXAS SECESSIONISTS IN 1863
       Edited by David J. Gerleman

Southwestern Collection

Book Reviews

Index

Book Reviews

Brian C. Black, Crude Reality: Petroleum in World History.
BY JAMES E. COUSAR

Patrick L. Cox and Kenneth E. Hendrickson Jr, eds., Writing the Story of Texas.
BY ALWYN BARR

Bruce Glasrud and James C. Maroney, eds., Texas Labor History.
BY DAVID CULLEN

James L. Haley, The Texas Supreme Court: A Narrative History, 1836–1986.
BY PAUL KENS

Gene Rhea Tucker, Oysters, Macaroni, and Beer: Thurber, Texas, and the Company Store.
BY JENNIFER S. LAWRENCE

James Collett and the Cowboy Country Museum, Stamford and Gillespie County Historical Society, Gillespie County.
BY NOËL HARRIS FREEZE

Marie Pennell Thurston, St. Philip’s College: A Point of Pride on San Antonio’s Eastside.
BY LIGHT TOWNSEND CUMMINS

William Dunmire, New Mexico’s Spanish Livestock Heritage: Four Centuries of Animals, Land, and People.
BY MATTHEW M. DAY

Stan Hoig, Came Men on Horses: The Conquistador Expeditions of Francisco Vázquez de Coronado and Don Juan de Oñate.
BY RICHARD FLINT

Omar S. Valerio-Jiménez, River of Hope: Forging Identity and Nation in the Rio Grande Borderlands.
BY ARMANDO ALONZO

Beatriz de la Garza, From the Republic of the Rio Grande: A Personal History of the Place and the People.
BY GABRIELA GONZÁLEZ

Michael Scott Van Wagenen, Remembering the Forgotten War: The Enduring Legacies of the U.S.-Mexican War.
BY JOSÉ MARÍA HERRERA

William S. Kiser, Dragoons in Apacheland: Conquest and Resistance in Southern New Mexico, 1846–1861.
BY BRETT J. DERBES

Anne Peterson, The Civil War in Photographs: New Perspectives From the Robin Stanford Collection.
BY BOB CAVENDISH

Robert W. Lull, Civil War General and Indian Fighter James M. Williams: Leader of the 1st Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry and the 8th U.S. Cavalry.
BY JOHN D. HUDDLESTON

Linda English, By All Accounts: General Stores and Community Life in Texas and Indian Territory.
BY DAN K. UTLEY

Kathleen P. Chamberlain, In the Shadow of Billy the Kid: Susan McSween and the Lincoln County War.
BY RICH HALL

Mary S. Melcher, Pregnancy, Motherhood, and Choice in Twentieth-Century Arizona.
BY LINDA ENGLISH

Dori Griffin, Mapping Wonderlands: Illustrated Cartography of Arizona, 1912–1962
BY DANIEL D. ARREOLA

Betty Holland Wiesepape, Winifred Sanford: The Life and Times of a Texas Writer.
BY DICKIE M. HEABERLIN

Dave Oliphant, KD: A Jazz Biography.
BY JOE W. SPECHT ?

Dean Smith with Mike Cox, Cowboy Stuntman: From Olympic Gold to the Silver Screen.
BY DOLPH BRISCOE IV

Jane Dunn Sibley, Jane’s Window: My Spirited Life in West Texas and Austin.
BY GARY A. KEITH