Nominating Committee Members


Patrick Cox, Ph.D. of Wimberley, Texas is an award-winning and nationally recognized historian, author and conservationist with a record of service, policy development and implementation. A sixth generation Texan who resides with his wife Brenda in Wimberley, Texas, he is President of Patrick Cox Consultants, LLC. His firm specializes in historical and environmental publications and projects. Dr. Cox received his Ph.D. in history and his B.A. in history from the University of Texas at Austin. He earned his M.A. in History with Honors from Texas State University. Selected publications include: Ralph W. Yarborough, The People’s Senator; Tom Sealy – A Man of Action; Ranching in the Wild Horse Desert; The House Will Come to Order; and The First Texas News Barons. Service and publication awards include: Texas State Historical Association Fellow; East Texas Historical Association Fellow; Texas Institute of Letters; Distinguished Alumni Award - Texas State University; Distinguished Alumni - Texas State University College of Liberal Arts; Texas Oral History Award, San Antonio Conservation Society Book Award, the American Journalism Historians Association – President’s Award; the Philosophical Society of Texas; and the Melvin Jones Humanitarian Award from the Lions International Foundation.

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Mary Margaret McAllen was raised on a storied South Texas ranch and writes about the history of the Southwest and Mexico. Her three books include the award-winning and best-selling I Would Rather Sleep in Texas (Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 2003); A Brave Boy and a Good Soldier: John C. C. Hill and the Texas Expedition to Mier (Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 2006); and Maximilian and Carlota: Europe's Last Empire in Mexico (San Antonio, TX: Trinity University Press, 2014).  She has written book introductions and contributed to anthologies and has appeared on the PBS series History Detectives and contributed to Henry Louis Gate’s Faces of America. She lives in San Antonio, and after earning her M.A. in history she taught as an adjunct professor of history at the University of Texas at San Antonio. She currently serves as Director of Special Projects at the Witte Museum.

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Jesús F. "Frank" de la Teja has a lengthy, active relationship with TSHA and its programs. He served as TSHA President in 2007-2008 while simultaneously serving as the inaugural Texas State Historian (2007-2009). For seventeen years, De la Teja was the book review editor of the Southwestern Historical Quarterly and also contributed research articles to the journal. He has long advised on Handbook of Texas projects, most recently with the Handbook of Tejano History. He and his wife established TSHA’s Catarino and Evangelina Hernández Research Fellowship to support research in Latino history in Texas. Named a TSHA Fellow in 2001, De la Teja has published extensively on Spanish, Mexican, and Republic-era Texas. He was the Jerome H. and Catherine E. Supple Professor of Southwestern Studies, Regents’ Professor of History, and Director of the Center for the Study of the Southwest at Texas State University-San Marcos until his retirement in August 2017. De la Teja earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Seton Hall University and his doctorate in colonial Latin American history from The University of Texas at Austin.

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Detroit, Michigan, native Bernadette Pruitt is associate professor of history and has been a member of the Department of History since 1996. She teaches classes on race and ethnicity, internal migrations, slavery, Recent United States history, and the African Diaspora. The first Black woman to earn a PhD in History from the University of Houston, she obtained her undergraduate and master’s degrees from HBCU Texas Southern University. The teacher-mentor is also an accomplished scholar. Her monograph, The Other Great Migration: The Movement of Rural African Americans to Houston, 1900-1941 (College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2013), examines Black internal migration and community building in what ultimately becomes the fourth largest city in the United States. Pruitt’s book is one of the first scholarly attempts to address the Great Migrations within the South. The scholar has won several awards, including the 2014 Ottis Lock Superb Book Award with the East Texas Historical Association (ETHA). She is also the past recipient of other awards and fellowships including the University of Illinois at Chicago African American Studies Department postdoctoral fellowship, Huggins-Quarles Award with the Organization of American Historians (OAH), the University of Houston African American Studies Dissertation Fellowship, the Ima Hogg Scholarship with the Dolph-Briscoe Center for American History at the University of Texas at Austin, and the Fred White Jr. and Mary M. Hughes Research Fellowships in Texas History with the Texas State Historical Association. An engaged activist scholar, the historian currently serves as a member for the OAH Committee on the Status of Women in the Historical Profession and is past chair of the 2015 Darlene Clark Hine Book Prize Committee, also with the OAH. She also serves on the Ottis Locke Prize Committee with the ETHA as well as a past ETHA board member. The co-advisor of the Sigma Phi Chapter of Phi Alpha Theta National History Honor Society, Pruitt has also served on the National Advisory Board and National Council of the honor society.

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