Development Committee Members


Patrick Cox, Ph.D. of Wimberley, Texas is an award-winning and nationally recognized historian, author and conservationist with a record of service, policy development and implementation. A sixth generation Texan who resides with his wife Brenda in Wimberley, Texas, he is President of Patrick Cox Consultants, LLC. His firm specializes in historical and environmental publications and projects. Dr. Cox received his Ph.D. in history and his B.A. in history from the University of Texas at Austin. He earned his M.A. in History with Honors from Texas State University. Selected publications include: Ralph W. Yarborough, The People’s Senator; Tom Sealy – A Man of Action; Ranching in the Wild Horse Desert; The House Will Come to Order; and The First Texas News Barons. Service and publication awards include: Texas State Historical Association Fellow; East Texas Historical Association Fellow; Texas Institute of Letters; Distinguished Alumni Award - Texas State University; Distinguished Alumni - Texas State University College of Liberal Arts; Texas Oral History Award, San Antonio Conservation Society Book Award, the American Journalism Historians Association – President’s Award; the Philosophical Society of Texas; and the Melvin Jones Humanitarian Award from the Lions International Foundation.

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Alan Tully, Ph.D, joined the University of Texas at Austin Department of History as the Eugene C. Barker Centennial Professor of American History in 2002. His scholarly field is Early American History. Before coming to the University of Texas, Dr. Tully was Head of History, Coordinator of the International Student Initiative for the Faculty of Arts, and Dean of Arts at the University of British Columbia. He received his Ph.D. in History at Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Tully has written two well-known books on colonial political culture, William Penn's Legacy: Politics and Social Structure in Provincial Pennsylvania, 1726-1755 (The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1977) and Forming American Politics: Ideals, Interests, and Institutions in Colonial New York and Pennsylvania (The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994). He and Texas colleague Robert Olwell have co-edited, Cultures and Identities in Colonial British America (The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2006, revised edition, 2015).

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John W. Crain of Dallas is President and CEO of the Summerlee Foundation. He is a Life Member of the TSHA Board of Directors and a past President, having served as the Association's 60th president from 2004-2005. Crain also serves as the Vice-Chair of the Texas Historical Commission and is chair of the Antiquities Advisory Board. Crain serves as an ex-officio member of the Sixth Floor Museum. He is also an advisory director of the Clements Center at SMU and the Friends of the Texas State History Museum. Crain has also served as President of the Texas Map Society. He received a bachelor's degree from the University of Texas and a master's degree from Southwest Texas State University. Crain holds a Certificate in Arts Administration from Harvard University, a Certificate in Museum Management from the University of California at Berkeley, and is a graduate of the Endowment Institute. He has continued to be a member of a number of learned and honorary societies, including the Philosophical Society of Texas, the Phillip Lee Phillips Society of the Library of Congress and the Sons of the Republic of Texas, Thomas J. Rusk Chapter in Dallas.

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Sarita Armstrong Hixon of Armstrong and Houston, serves as a County Commissioner of Kenedy County. Proudly following in the footsteps of her mother, Ambassador Anne Armstrong, Ms. Hixon was appointed to fill her mother’s position as a County Commissioner and was re-elected to the office. For over 150 years, her family has owned The Armstrong Ranch—a working ranch in Kenedy County, where Ms. Hixon grew up and which she now co-manages. Ms. Hixon serves on the board of trustees of the Texas State History Museum Foundation, the Friends of the Texas Historical Commission and the Houston Hospice. Ms. Hixon was appointed to the Texas Historical Commission in 2005 and served until 2011. She is a former Chairman of the San Jacinto Museum of History Association and currently serves on their advisory board. She also previously served on the San Jacinto Historical Advisory Board, and on the board of trustees of the Friends of Communities in Schools in Houston. A graduate of the University of Texas at Austin, she received her law degree from Southern Methodist University Dedman School of Law. She served as a law clerk for the Honorable Owen D. Cox, United States District Judge, Southern District of Texas and was an associate attorney with the Houston law firm of Andrews & Kurth, LLP.

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Mary Margaret McAllen was raised on a storied South Texas ranch and writes about the history of the Southwest and Mexico. Her three books include the award-winning and best-selling I Would Rather Sleep in Texas (Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 2003); A Brave Boy and a Good Soldier: John C. C. Hill and the Texas Expedition to Mier (Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 2006); and Maximilian and Carlota: Europe's Last Empire in Mexico (San Antonio, TX: Trinity University Press, 2014).  She has written book introductions and contributed to anthologies and has appeared on the PBS series History Detectives and contributed to Henry Louis Gate’s Faces of America. She lives in San Antonio, and after earning her M.A. in history she taught as an adjunct professor of history at the University of Texas at San Antonio. She currently serves as Director of Special Projects at the Witte Museum.

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Kent R. Hance is native of Dimmitt, Texas, and the founding partner of the Austin law firm Hance Scarborough, L.L.P. Hance earned a B.B.A. from Texas Tech University and a law degree from the University of Texas. After working on the campaign of former governor Preston Smith, Hance worked in private practice and as a law professor at Texas Tech. In 1974, Hance was elected to represent the Lubbock area in the Texas State Senate, and in 1978 he was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. As a congressman, Hance authored and won passage of President Ronald Reagan’s tax cut plan. After leaving Congress, Hance served as a commissioner and chairman of the Texas Railroad Commission. From 2006 to 2014, Hance served his alma mater as Chancellor of the Texas Tech University System, helping raise more than $1.2 billion and increasing the system’s student enrollment by 45%. Hance currently serves as Chancellor Emeritus of Texas Tech, teaches a seminar class on leadership at Texas Tech, and works at his law firm representing clients in Texas and Washington, D.C.

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Homero S. Vera is the Chief Ranch Property Officer for the Kenedy Memorial Foundation Ranch and serves concurrently as the Museum Coordinator of the Kenedy Ranch Museum of South Texas. A native of Premont, he attended Texas A&I University and now lives in Sarita. Vera has been a regional historian since 1997 when he began editing and publishing El Mesteño Magazine, a publication about the history of the Mexican-Americans of South Texas and Northern Mexico. An eighth generation Tejano, Vera is descended from the early Spanish settlers of Nuevo Santander on the Rio Grande River in Cd. Mier from the 1750s. His family has been into ranching since that time. They moved to Duval County in the late 1850s where they established ranches in the southern part of the county.

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Heather Green Wooten is an adjunct assistant professor for the Institute for the Medical Humanities at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (UTMB) where she teaches courses in medical history and medical ethics. She specializes in the history of disease epidemics, women and medicine and American medical biography. Wooten’s first book, The Polio Years in Texas: Battling a Terrifying Unknown was a recipient of the Mary M. Hughes Research Fellowship, the T. R. Fehrenbach Book Award by the Texas Historical Commission, and ETHA’s Ottis Lock Endowment Award. Recent publications include Old Red: Pioneering Medical Education in Texas for the TSHA Fred Rider Cotten Popular History Series, and Skilled Hands: Surgery at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston, co-authored with William Henry Kellar. Her latest endeavor involves writing the 50-year history of the Graduate School of the Biomedical Sciences at UTMB. In 2018, Wooten was appointed Project Director for the Handbook of Texas Medicine, currently undergoing development. She is an active member of many regional and state historical organizations, and a past president of the East Texas Historical Association. Wooten earned a Ph.D. in the Medical Humanities from UTMB in 2006.

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Ricardo Romo earned his Ph.D. in history from UCLA (1975). A nationally respected urban historian, Romo is the author of East Los Angeles: History of a Barrio, now in its ninth printing (one in Spanish). Romo served as the fifth president of the University of Texas at San Antonio from 1999 to 2017. He has taught and published in the field of civil rights, Mexican American history, and urban history. Ricardo and his wife Harriett have been recognized for their philanthropy in the arts. Over the past 20 years, they have donated nearly 2,000 Latino art prints and paintings to a dozen museums.

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