Andrew J. Torget, Ph.D.

Denton, TX

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Andrew J. Torget is an associate professor at the University of North Texas, where he specializes in Texas, the Old South, the U.S.-Mexico borderlands, and digital scholarship. The founder and director of numerous digital humanities projects -- including the Digital Austin Papers, Mapping Texts, Texas Slavery Project, and Voting America -- Andrew earned his Ph.D. from the University of Virginia and served as the founding director of the Digital Scholarship Lab at the University of Richmond. In 2011, he was named the inaugural David J. Weber Research Fellow at the Clements Center for Southwest Studies at Southern Methodist University. His most recent book is Seeds of Empire: Cotton, Slavery, and the Transformation of the Texas Borderlands, 1800-1850, which won numerous book prizes and awards, including the David J. Weber-Clements Center Prize for Best Non-Fiction Book on Southwestern America from the Western Historical Association.


Publications

A Southern Community in Crisis: Harrison County, Texas, 1850-1880


"Few academic volumes remain timely and relevant more than thirty years after they were first published. This is one of those exceptional books."—from the foreword by Andrew J. TorgetHistorians have published countless studies of the American Civil War and the era of Reconstruction that followed those four years of brutally destructive conflict. Most of these works focus on events and developments at the national or state level, but much less attention has been given to studying how ordinary people experienced the years from 1861 to 1876. What did secession, civil war, emancipation, victory for the United States, and Reconstruction mean at the local level in Texas? Exactly how much change did the era bring to the focus of the study, Harrison County: a cotton-growing, planter-dominated community with the largest slave population of any county in the state? Providing an answer to that question is the basic purpose of A Southern Community in Crisis: Harrison County, Texas, 1850–1880. First published by the Texas State Historical Association in 1983, the book is now available in paperback, with a foreword by Andrew J. Torget, one of the Lone Star State’s top young historians.Randolph B. Campbell is Regents' Professor of History at the University of North Texas. One of the leading historians of Texas of his generation, he has served as Chief Historian of the Texas State Historical Association and is the author of numerous articles and books, including An Empire for Slavery: The Peculiar Institution in Texas, 1821–1865 and Gone to Texas: A History of the Lone Star State.Andrew J. Torget is associate professor of history at the University of North Texas and the author of Seeds of Empire: Cotton, Slavery, and the Transformation of the Texas Borderlands, 1800–1850.

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Seeds of Empire: Cotton, Slavery, and the Transformation of the Texas Borderlands, 1800-1850


By the late 1810s, a global revolution in cotton had remade the U.S.-Mexico border, bringing wealth and waves of Americans to the Gulf Coast while also devastating the lives and villages of Mexicans in Texas. In response, Mexico threw open its northern territories to American farmers in hopes that cotton could bring prosperity to the region. Thousands of Anglo-Americans poured into Texas, but their insistence that slavery accompany them sparked pitched battles across Mexico. An extraordinary alliance of Anglos and Mexicans in Texas came together to defend slavery against abolitionists in the Mexican government, beginning a series of fights that culminated in the Texas Revolution.
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TSHA Positions

Locations

Denton, TX

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