Jack Jackson

image placeholder
No bio found

Publications

Almonte's Texas: Juan N. Almonte's 1834 Inspection, Secret Report, and Role in the 1836 Campaign


In late 1833 Mexico began to have serious fears that its northeastern territory in Texas would be lost to North American colonists. To determine the actual state of affairs, Mexico sent Col. Juan N. Almonte to Texas on an inspection--the last conducted by a high-ranking Mexican official before revolution separated Texas from Mexico. Upon his return to the Mexican capital in November 1834, Almonte wrote a secret report of the measures necessary to avoid the loss of Texas--a report that has been unknown to scholars or the general public. Here it is presented in English for the first time, along with more than fifty letters that Almonte wrote during his inspection. This documentation offers crucial new insights on Texas affairs and will change the way historians regard Mexico’s attitudes toward the foreign colonists and their revolution of 1835-1836. When Santa Anna marched an army north to crush the Texas rebellion, Almonte was by his side as a special advisor. He kept a journal, lost at the Battle of San Jacinto, which is presented here with full annotation. Almonte’s role in the 1836 campaign is examined, as well as his subsequent activities that relate to Texas. Through Almonte’s Texas we gain an overdue appreciation of this man who played a leading role in the history of Texas and Mexico.
View More »

Flags Along the Coast


Flags along the Coast: Charting the Gulf of Mexico, 1519-1759: A Reappraisal is a limited-edition text that focuses in the first half on two maps created by Spaniards that changed the course of history in the Gulf of Mexico, and in the second half on the early history of French Louisiana. Donald E. Chipman wrote in Southwestern Historical Quarterly that Jackson's book is "based on impeccable scholarship. It is also a labor of love by one of Texas's most diversely talented historians."
View More »

Imaginary Kingdom: Texas as Seen by the Rivera and Rubi Military Expeditions, 1727 and 1767


The diaries of Pedro de Rivera and the Marques de Rubí, written in the eighteenth century during inspections of the far northern frontier of New Spain, are crucial documents for studying and understanding the Spanish presence on the frontier of what would one day be Texas. Rivera's diary, previously unavailable in English translation, and the heretofore unknown Rubí diary are both presented here, carefully placed in historical context by Jackson and Foster. Because of Spain's tenuous hold on the distant frontier, Rubí and Rivera saw it as an imaginary possession—the king's domain in name only. No other military visits to the frontier in this era rivaled those of Rivera and Rubí in scope, organization, or execution. They were significant fact-finding commissions, authorized by the Spanish king, that resulted in extensive reports, broad recommendations, and tangible changes in military regulations for the presidios on the far northern frontier. To understand Texas and its adjacent provinces at this formative time, students and scholars of the Borderlands must examine the records left by these two military expeditions. These remarkable documents contain fascinating insights into the early Spanish road systems, the early towns and missions, the Indians, and the flora and fauna. Each diary has an introduction, and detailed route maps and annotations are provided. Following the diaries and related documents, each inspection is assessed in depth. These two diaries, and the editors' careful annotation and analysis, provide significant new material which will help further understanding of Spanish Texas, the people who inhabited it, and its influence on the Texas of today.
View More »

Los Mesteños: Spanish Ranching in Texas, 1721-1821


Jack Jackson chronicles in rich detail the hundred years of Spanish ranching that came before Mexico, and subsequently Texas, gained independence. From the introduction of livestock into the province by various early entradas (expeditions), to the first big roundup in 1787, and beyond, he traces the development of the range and of cattle working. He shows the feral increase of the early herds, the conflicts over ownership of the wild animals (mesteños), the emergence of Spanish "dynasties," and the attempts of colonial governments to regulate the industry.
View More »

New Texas History Movies


Many will remember Texas History Movies, a cartoon booklet that was distributed to Texas history students from the 1920s through the 1960s by Mobil Oil with its familiar Flying Red Horse logo. For decades Texas History Movies taught thousands of school children the varied history of Texas, from Columbus to the discovery of oil. Though the original version is now considered racist, it was for many students their first and only taste of Texas history.It is with great pride that the Texas State Historical Association announces the publication of our newest version of this timeless Texas history classic by the late Jack Jackson, award-winning scholar and illustrator. The New Texas History Movies is a totally revised edition with new cartoon strips and text by Jackson. Jackson gained fame as an underground cartoonist in the 1960s and, later, as an independent scholar who specialized in the history of the Spanish presence in Texas.Jack took much pride in this revision, for the original Texas History Movies was a great inspiration to him. As Jackson states in the afterword, it was his objective "to create a 'time- machine' effect that would make readers feel like they were there when the events occurred." He hoped that his "rendition of the old classic, Texas History Movies, would 'grab' a few young minds and make them want to learn more about the interesting people and events briefly touched on in this booklet." It could almost be said that Jack's love for Texas history began with Texas History Movies; and it is fitting that his work has come full circle with his rendition of this enduring Texas history classic.An Educator's Edition with additional content by Jana Magruder is available to help teachers incorporate this book into the seventh- grade curriculum. The TEKS-based guide contains activities and TAKS-based assessments for each chapter. It is designed to facilitate interdisciplinary connections between history and language arts teachers while building student skills in reading, writing, and social studies. Included in this Educator's Edition is a CD-ROM containing the materials necessary for easy classroom use.
View More »

Shooting the Sun: Cartographic Results of Military Activities in Texas, 1689-1892


Shooting the Sun: Cartographic Results of Military Activities in Texas, 1689-1829, like Flags along the Coast, is published by the Book Club of Texas. While the latter is a study of the charting of the coastline, Shooting the Sun focuses on the cartographic history of the Texas interior.
View More »

The official store of TSHA. All proceeds support our Texas history programs and publications. Shop now