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Agua Dulce Creek, Battle of

Curtis Bishop General Entry

The battle of Agua Dulce Creek, an engagement of the Texas Revolution and an aftermath of the controversial Matamoros expedition of 1835–36, occurred twenty-six miles below San Patricio on March 2, 1836. Dr. James Grant and his party of twenty-three Americans and three Mexicans were surprised and defeated by a Mexican force under José de Urrea. Six of the volunteers escaped, five of whom joined James W. Fannin, Jr., at Goliad and were killed in the Goliad Massacre on March 27; six were captured and taken to Matamoros as prisoners; all others were killed in the engagement.

Harbert Davenport, "Men of Goliad," Southwestern Historical Quarterly 43 (July 1939). Cyrus Baird Tilloson, "The Battle of the Agua Dulce," Frontier Times, December 1947. Vertical Files, Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin. Henderson K. Yoakum, History of Texas from Its First Settlement in 1685 to Its Annexation to the United States in 1846 (2 vols., New York: Redfield, 1855).

Time Periods:

  • Texas Revolution

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this entry.

Curtis Bishop, “Agua Dulce Creek, Battle of,” Handbook of Texas Online, accessed November 27, 2020, https://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/entries/agua-dulce-creek-battle-of.

Published by the Texas State Historical Association.

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