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Gunter Bible College

N. L. Clark General

Gunter Bible College, a junior college directed by members of the Church of Christ, was located at Gunter in Grayson County from September 1903 to May 1928, when it was moved to Littlefield, where it operated until May 1930. The school opened with three teachers and nine students and later grew to twelve teachers and 190 students. In addition to the junior college courses, the institution conducted elementary and high school programs. All students were required to study the Bible, and special courses were offered for ministerial students. Some 150 preachers received their training there. The first president of Gunter College was Nimrod L. Clark, who served for nine years. Alfred Ellmore was president from 1912 until 1922, when he was succeeded by John R. Freeman. R. F. Duckworth served as president for a year while the school was in Littlefield. The college was controlled by non-Sunday School advocates and became a power base for the idea that Sunday School is unscriptural. G. A. Trott (1855–1930) of Munday, Texas, founded The Apostolic Way (1913–30) to promulgate this idea. Both the school and the periodical failed after moving to Littlefield. Disagreement over the use of multiple Communion cups and the death of Dr. Trott contributed to the school's failure.

Ronnie F. Wade, The Sun Will Shine Again, Someday (Springfield, Missouri, 1988). M. Norvel Young, A History of Colleges Established and Conducted by Members of the Churches of Christ (Kansas City: Old Paths Book Club, 1949).

Categories:

  • Education
  • Defunct Colleges and Universities
  • Religion
  • Church Of Christ

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this entry.

N. L. Clark, “Gunter Bible College,” Handbook of Texas Online, accessed September 22, 2020, https://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/entries/gunter-bible-college.

Published by the Texas State Historical Association.

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