Indianola Hurricanes

By: Helen B. Frantz

Type: General Entry

Published: 1952

Updated: September 1, 1995


The first of the two great Indianola hurricanes that resulted in the demise of the town began on September 15, 1875, when Indianola was crammed with visitors attending a trial growing out of the Sutton-Taylor Feud. The hurricane blew in from the sea, carrying the water from Matagorda Bay deep into Indianola's streets. Two days later, when the storm had subsided, only eight buildings were left undamaged, and fatalities were estimated at between 150 and 300 persons. After being rebuilt on a lesser scale, Indianola was completely destroyed by a second hurricane that blew in on August 19, 1886, this time accompanied by fire. This storm was considered worse than the first one, but because there was less town, it caused less damage.

Jessie Beryl Boozer, The History of Indianola, Texas (M.A. thesis, University of Texas, 1942). George H. French, comp., Indianola Scrap Book (Victoria: Victoria Advocate, 1936; rpt., Austin: San Felipe, 1974). Brownson Malsch, Indianola-The Mother of Western Texas (Austin: Shoal Creek, 1977).

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this entry.

Helen B. Frantz, “Indianola Hurricanes,” Handbook of Texas Online, accessed September 23, 2021, https://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/entries/indianola-hurricanes.

Published by the Texas State Historical Association.

1952
September 1, 1995

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