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Jersey Village, TX

Diana J. Kleiner General Entry

Jersey Village, an incorporated suburb of Houston, is on Farm Road 529, U.S. Highway 290, and the Southern Pacific line, in west central Harris County. The 1936 county highway map showed multiple dwellings at the site. The community officially began in 1953, when Clark W. Henry, with N. E. Kennedy and Son, decided to develop homesites on Jersey Lake. One story has it that Henry had previously run a dairy and named the new development for his Jersey cows. Local schoolchildren first attended classes in Cypress and Fairbanks, but space was set aside at Jersey Village for a school, a park, and an eighteen-hole golf course. The community incorporated, with a volunteer police force, in 1956. A new high school was completed there in 1972. From 1961 to 1980 the town's reported population rose from 493 to 966. In 1982 it was 4,084, and in 1988 it reached a new high of 5,143. The population of Jersey Village was reported as 4,938 in 1990. The population of Jersey Village was reported as 4,938 in 1990 and 6,880 in 2000. In 2010 the population was 7,620.

Houston Metropolitan Research Center Files, Houston Public Library.

Time Periods:

  • Texas Post World War II

Places:

  • Communities
  • Houston
  • Upper Gulf Coast
  • East Texas

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this entry.

Diana J. Kleiner, “Jersey Village, TX,” Handbook of Texas Online, accessed December 01, 2020, https://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/entries/jersey-village-tx.

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