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Peyton, TX (Blanco County)

Mary H. Ogilvie General Entry

Peyton (Payton), formerly known as Peyton Colony and Board House (Boardhouse), is near Boardhouse Creek just west of the junction of Farm roads 165 and 2325, seven miles east of Blanco in southeastern Blanco County. The settlement was called Freedman's Colony by white inhabitants of the area, when it was founded around 1865 by Peyton Roberts, an exslave from Lockhart, who had acquired public land there by preemption. Other freedmen followed suit, and though preemption technically ended in 1876, land patents in the area continued to be issued as late as 1880. In 1872 or 1874 the first church in the area was built on land donated by Jim Upshear, who had come with his wife to Peyton by wagon train from Virginia. Also built was a small log schoolhouse. A post office operated in Peyton from 1898 to 1909. Another post office operated from 1918 to 1930, but it was officially named Board House because it was located in A. V. Walker's board house, the first in the community. Though Board House has not appeared on Texas maps since then, Peyton still existed in the 1990s and housed the descendants of many of the original settlers. Community life centered around the Mount Horeb Baptist Church. In 2000 the population was thirty.

Austin American-Statesman, August 6, 1954. T. Lindsay Baker, Ghost Towns of Texas (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1986). San Antonio Light, Supplement, August 11, 1985.

Places:

  • Communities

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this entry.

Mary H. Ogilvie, “Peyton, TX (Blanco County),” Handbook of Texas Online, accessed December 01, 2020, https://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/entries/peyton-tx-blanco-county.

Published by the Texas State Historical Association.

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