Members Only Area
Bookmark and Share
sidebar menu icon


CAUX INDIANS. These are the Indians who held François Simars de Bellisle captive for several months in 1719–20. Their location has now been established as the vicinity of Galveston Bay in southeastern Texas. They have been tentatively identified as Coco Indians, but their location and De Bellisle's description of their culture strongly indicate that they were the Akokisas, well known to the Spanish through missionary activity in this area later in the eighteenth century. The Akokisas were Atakapan-speaking Indians who dominated the coastal strip that lies between present Houston and Beaumont.


Henri Folmer, "De Bellisle on the Texas Coast," Southwestern Historical Quarterly 44 (October 1940). Pierre Margry, ed., Découvertes et établissements des Français dans l'ouest et dans le sud de l'Amérique septentrionale, 1614–1754 (6 vols., Paris: Jouast, 1876–86). M. de Villiers du Terrage and P. Rivet, "Les Indiens du Texas et les expéditions françaises de 1720 et 1721 a la Baie Saint-Bernard," Journal de la Société des Américanistes de Paris 11 (1919).

Thomas N. Campbell

Image Use Disclaimer

All copyrighted materials included within the Handbook of Texas Online are in accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107 related to Copyright and “Fair Use” for Non-Profit educational institutions, which permits the Texas State Historical Association (TSHA), to utilize copyrighted materials to further scholarship, education, and inform the public. The TSHA makes every effort to conform to the principles of fair use and to comply with copyright law.

For more information go to:

If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond fair use, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.


The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Thomas N. Campbell, "CAUX INDIANS," Handbook of Texas Online (, accessed December 01, 2015. Uploaded on June 12, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.