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HUANE INDIANS

HUANE INDIANS. The Huane (Juana, Juane, Xauana, Xaunzo, Xuana) Indians were first mentioned in 1683–84 as one of the groups that Juan Domínguez de Mendoza expected to meet on the Colorado River east of the site of future San Angelo. The Huanes were one of the Coahuiltecan groups for whom the San José y San Miguel de Aguayo Mission was established at San Antonio in 1720. Their aboriginal range is not recorded, but it was probably the area just south of the Edwards Plateau.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Frederick Webb Hodge, ed., Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico (2 vols., Washington: GPO, 1907, 1910; rpt., New York: Pageant, 1959). Gaspar José de Solís, "Diary," trans. Margaret Kenny Kress, Southwestern Historical Quarterly 35 (July 1931). J. R. Swanton, Linguistic Material from the Tribes of Southern Texas and Northeastern Mexico (Washington: Smithsonian Institution, 1940).

Thomas N. Campbell

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Thomas N. Campbell, "HUANE INDIANS," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/bmh18), accessed April 24, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.