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TARAHA INDIANS

TARAHA INDIANS. The Taraha (Tara, Thara) Indians are known only from records of the La Salle expedition, which indicate that these Indians lived southwest of the Hasinai tribes, probably between the Brazos and Trinity rivers. The Tarahas did not live in Arkansas, as some have suggested, because the records clearly show that the La Salle party visited a large Taraha village shortly before La Salle was murdered. The linguistic and cultural affiliations of the Taraha Indians have not been determined. Some writers have called them Caddoan, others Atakapan, and still others Athapascan.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 
Isaac Joslin Cox, ed., The Journeys of René Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle (2 vols., New York: Barnes, 1905; 2d ed., New York: Allerton, 1922). Charles W. Hackett, ed., Pichardo's Treatise on the Limits of Louisiana and Texas (4 vols., Austin: University of Texas Press, 1931–46). Frederick Webb Hodge, ed., Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico (2 vols., Washington: GPO, 1907, 1910; rpt., New York: Pageant, 1959).
Thomas N. Campbell

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The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Handbook of Texas Online, Thomas N. Campbell, "Taraha Indians," accessed August 26, 2016, http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/bmt20.

Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.