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MANSION HOUSE

MANSION HOUSE. Several early hotels in Texas were named Mansion House. The Mansion House on the north side of Columbia Street between Harrison and Montgomery streets in San Augustine was built by Almanzon Huston sometime before the winter of 1836, when he sold it to Harrison E. Watson and Alexander Horton. It had two front rooms divided by a wide hall and an upper and a lower gallery extending the length of the building. Watson and Horton rented the front rooms to serve as the courtroom for the first session of the Fifth Circuit Court of the republic, presided over by Robert M. Williamson in the fall of 1837. In 1844 the property was divided between Huston and Philip A. Sublett. John Mackechney managed the hotel for several years after Huston's death. The Mansion House in Houston was established by Pamelia Mann at the corner of Congress and Milam streets shortly after the town was laid out. After Mrs. Mann's death, it passed into other hands and was called De Chene's Hotel between February 15 and June 2, 1844, when A. Senchal, a new owner, renamed it the Mansion House. Robert S. Neighbors was the owner of the Mansion House between October 1844 and January 1, 1845, when T. J. Perkins became owner.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 
Margaret Dorothea Bright, Social Development of Houston, Texas, 1836–1860 (M.A. thesis, University of Texas, 1940). George L. Crocket, Two Centuries in East Texas (Dallas: Southwest, 1932; facsimile reprod. 1962). Alice Atkinson Neighbors, Life and Public Work of Robert S. Neighbors (M.A. thesis, University of Texas, 1936). Ralph Smith, The Life of Alexander Horton (M.A. thesis, University of Texas, 1936).

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The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Handbook of Texas Online, "Mansion House," accessed September 28, 2016, http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/ccm01.

Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.