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GACETA DE TEJAS

GACETA DE TEJAS. The Gaceta de Tejas, said to be the first newspaper written on Texas soil, was published by William Shaler and José Álvarez de Toledo y Dubois. The press on which it was printed was brought to Texas in May 1813. The printers were a man named Moore and another who may possibly have been Godwin Brown Cottenqv. Because of a quarrel with José Bernardo Gutiérrez de Laraqv, Toledo, who already had his type set and dated at Nacogdoches, moved his press back to Natchitoches, Louisiana, and the paper was actually printed there sometime after May 13, 1813. The paper was written in Spanish and carried the motto "La Salud del Pueblo es la Suprema Ley" ("The Safety of the People is the Supreme Law"). Probably only one issue of the Gaceta ever appeared. The first page carried "Reflections," a sort of essay on Spanish-American independence. The second page was devoted to foreign news, with emphasis on aid from America for Texas independence. Whether or not any copies of the Gaceta ever reached Texas is uncertain, but its publication is a part of the story of the Gutiérrez-Magee expedition, and the paper was addressed to Texans and devoted to Texas affairs.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Joe B. Frantz, Newspapers of the Republic of Texas (M.A. thesis, University of Texas, 1940). Julia Kathryn Garrett, "The First Newspaper of Texas: Gaceta de Tejas," Southwestern Historical Quarterly 40 (January 1937). Ike H. Moore, "The Earliest Printing and First Newspaper in Texas," Southwestern Historical Quarterly 39 (October 1935). Marilyn M. Sibley, Lone Stars and State Gazettes: Texas Newspapers before the Civil War (College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 1983).

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

"GACETA DE TEJAS," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/eeg01), accessed July 13, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.