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CRANE, JOHN

CRANE, JOHN (?–1839). John Crane, early settler and soldier in the Texas revolutionary army, probably a native of Virginia, married Mary (called Polly) De Lozier and with her moved from Virginia to Tennessee, where he was a private in the Tennessee cavalry and served as a sergeant in the Tennessee militia in the War of 1812. In 1834 he moved to Texas and settled in what is now Walker County as a member of Joseph Vehlein's colony. Crane raised a company of volunteers for the siege of Bexar in 1835 and the next year participated in the Runaway Scrape, during which he cared for his own family and that of his son-in-law, who was with the army at the battle of San Jacinto. From June 30 to September 30, 1836, Crane served in the Texas army in John M. Wade's cavalry company. He was killed in the battle of the Neches during the Cherokee War in July 1839.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 
D'Anne McAdams Crews, ed., Huntsville and Walker County, Texas: A Bicentennial History (Huntsville, Texas: Sam Houston State University, 1976).
John Crane McVea

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Handbook of Texas Online, John Crane McVea, "Crane, John," accessed September 28, 2016, http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fcr03.

Uploaded on June 12, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.