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DEL VALLE, SANTIAGO

DEL VALLE, SANTIAGO (?–?). Santiago Del Valle was an hacendado in the Monclova area of Coahuila. Del Valle, Texas, is named for him or for his grant of land, within which the town is situated. He served as president of the Congreso Constituyente of the state of Coahuila and Texas in 1825, as counselor to the governor, and as the arbitrator in a feud between the Sánchez Navarro and Elizondo families. He was associated with Thomas F. McKinney and Samuel May Williamsqqv through the Banco de Comercio y Agricultura and the Galveston City Company. He received a ten-league grant, nine leagues of which he sold through Williams to Michel B. Menard and then to McKinney; the other league he sold to Bartlett Sims. Del Valle was a Catholic and a Federalist in Mexican politics and appears to have always resided in Coahuila.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 
Charles H. Harris, A Mexican Family Empire: The Latifundio of the Sánchez Navarros, 1765–1867 (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1975).
John W. Clark, Jr.

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The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Handbook of Texas Online, John W. Clark, Jr., "Del Valle, Santiago," accessed August 26, 2016, http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fde63.

Uploaded on June 12, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.