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FAUNT LE ROY, FREDERICK WILES

FAUNT LE ROY, FREDERICK WILES (1818–1900). Frederick Wiles Faunt Le Roy, lawyer, judge, and early settler, was born in Greenville, Virginia, on February 7, 1818, the son of Joseph and Emily Faunt Le Roy. He was reared at New Harmony, Indiana, where he clerked, read law, and was admitted to the bar in 1841. In 1842 he raised a company of volunteers and traveled to Texas to assist against the Mexican invasion of Adrián Woll. He participated in Indian campaigns and was in the ranger service from 1843 to 1845, when he raised a company of Mississippi Rifles, which he headed throughout the Mexican War. In 1855 he married Mary Ann Trotter of Cameron. They had four children. In 1856 the family settled at Belton but soon moved to Gatesville, where Faunt Le Roy was the only resident attorney when the first term of district court was held. In March 1860 Governor Sam Houston addressed to him and chief justices of various counties a circular instructing them to return to their homes to raise companies of volunteers for protection of the frontier. In February 1864 Faunt Le Roy enrolled in G. W. Haley's company under George B. Erath. In the late 1860s he was clerk and master in chancery of the district court at Brownsville and served for a time as district attorney. From 1882 to 1884 he was county judge of Coryell County. Faunt Le Roy was an Odd Fellow and a Methodist. He died at Gatesville on September 24, 1900.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

A Memorial and Biographical History of McLennan, Falls, Bell, and Coryell Counties (Chicago: Lewis, 1893; rpt., St. Louis: Ingmire, 1984). Zelma Scott, History of Coryell County (Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 1965).

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

"FAUNT LE ROY, FREDERICK WILES," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/ffa15), accessed July 12, 2014. Uploaded on June 12, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.