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HARDEMAN, BLACKSTONE, SR. (1790–1867). Blackstone Hardeman, pioneer Texas physician and planter and tenth child of Thomas and Mary (Perkins) Hardeman, was born at Hardeman's Station near Nashville, Tennessee, on March 24, 1790. His father was a North Carolina delegate to the United States Constitution ratifying convention and a close associate of Andrew Jackson, James Robertson, and other Tennessee frontiersmen. Hardeman lived in many areas of Tennessee, including Davidson, Williamson, Maury, Rutherford, and Hardeman counties. He took training as a physician and combined that profession with agriculture and business. In the fall of 1835 Hardeman and his wife, Anna Bunch Hardeman, accompanied a migration of nearly thirty family members from Tennessee to Texas. These included his brothers Bailey and Thomas Jones Hardeman and his sister Julia Ann, or Susanna. Blackstone and his eight children and large numbers of slaves (seventeen at the time of the census of 1840) moved often, from Washington to Nacogdoches, to Gonzales, and to Guadalupe counties. Blackstone's wife died in 1842, and four years later he married Elizabeth Foster. Dr. Hardeman's prominence as an early Texas physician was matched in other pursuits by his children. William was a soldier in the Mexican War, and he and his brother Blackstone, Jr., served in the Texas legislature. Peter Hardeman, Blackstone, Jr., and John were Confederate officers during the Civil War. Blackstone Hardeman, Sr., practiced medicine and raised cotton at his San Marcos River plantation until his death on September 14, 1867.


Nicholas P. Hardeman, Wilderness Calling: The Hardeman Family in the American Westward Movement, 1750–1900 (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1977).

Nicholas P. Hardeman

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Nicholas P. Hardeman, "HARDEMAN, BLACKSTONE, SR.," Handbook of Texas Online (, accessed December 01, 2015. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.