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HARRIS, ISHAM VINING (1794–1867). Isham V. Harris, legislator, was born on February 14, 1794, in Warren County, North Carolina, son of Wiley and Elisabeth (Hearne) Harris. He married Nancy Rogers at Reynoldsburg, Humphreys County, Tennessee, around 1824. They moved to Guadalupe County, Texas, in 1850.

He was elected to the Seventh Texas Legislature in 1857 as a representative from Guadalupe County. He and his senate colleague, Henry Eustace McCulloch, caused considerable ire among their constituents when they supported giving up part of Guadalupe County to create Blanco County. The voters voiced their displeasure and did not re-elect Harris to the Eighth Legislature.

Harris died on November 29, 1867, and was buried in the Harris Chapel Cemetery in Guadalupe County.


John Gesick, Jr., "A History of Seguin" (, accessed August 23, 2006. Guadalupe County Rootsweb (, accessed August 23, 2006. IGI Individual Record: "Isham Vining Harris" (, accessed August 23, 2006. Tennessee Genweb Project (, accessed August 23, 2006.

Stephanie P. Niemeyer

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The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Stephanie P. Niemeyer, "HARRIS, ISHAM VINING," Handbook of Texas Online (, accessed November 30, 2015. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Modified on August 23, 2014. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.