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HOIT, SAMUEL (1781–1835). Samuel Hoit, early colonist, was born in Chester, New Hampshire, on February 10, 1781, the son of Zabez and Abigail (Hasseltine) Hoit. Before moving to Texas in 1830, he was a justice of the peace and postmaster in Port Gibson, Mississippi. Hoit had three daughters and a son with his first wife, Betsy Blish; she died in 1823. One of his daughters married Joseph W. E. Wallace. On November 15, 1830, Hoit was granted title to a league of land on Matagorda Bay under Stephen F. Austin's fourth empresario contract. In the Convention of 1832 Hoit represented Mina (Bastrop). He married Mary Raney in Brazoria County on April 10, 1834. He died November 8, 1835, leaving one son, John Quincy Adams Hoyt, and two grandsons, William Hazelton Wallace and Edward Dorsey. In 1849, 3,704 acres of his original league in Matagorda County were sold by the tax collector for $11.11.


Matagorda County Historical Commission, Historic Matagorda County (3 vols., 1986–88). Texas House of Representatives, Biographical Directory of the Texan Conventions and Congresses, 1832–1845 (Austin: Book Exchange, 1941).

Sarah J. Della Corte

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Sarah J. Della Corte, "HOIT, SAMUEL," Handbook of Texas Online (, accessed November 30, 2015. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.