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SANER, ROBERT EDWARD LEE

SANER, ROBERT EDWARD LEE (1871–1938). Robert Edward Lee Saner, lawyer and Democratic party official, son of John Franklin and Susan Crawford (Webb) Saner, was born near Washington, Arkansas, on August 9, 1871. He attended Searcy College, Vanderbilt University, and the University of Texas, where he received his law degree in 1896. Centenary College and Southern Methodist University later conferred upon him honorary degrees. Admitted to the Texas bar in 1896, Saner began practice in Dallas. On March 31, 1903, he married Ileaine Marvin Smith. He was land attorney for the University of Texas from 1899 to 1929. He was secretary of the Democratic State Executive Committee from 1899 to 1901 and in 1917 was vice chairman of the Texas advisory board for the selective draft. He was the Texas member of the commission for uniform state laws from 1920 to 1934. While president of the American Bar Association in 1924, Saner arranged for 2,000 United States attorneys to visit Europe. He sponsored oratorical contests on the subject of the American Constitution and in 1925 was chairman of the first national Inter­Collegiate Oratorical Contest. In 1924 he published a Handbook for Citizenship Activities with Suggestions for the Celebration Thereof. Saner was a member of the American Academy of Political Science and the general counsel for the American Bar Association and chairman of the board of editors of the American Bar Journal from 1920 to 1938. He died at his home in Dallas on October 31, 1938, and was buried in the cemetery at Brenham.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Dallas Morning News, November 1, 1938. Who Was Who in America, Vol. 2.

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

"SANER, ROBERT EDWARD LEE," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fsa26), accessed April 17, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.