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ADDICKS, TX

ADDICKS, TEXAS. Addicks, known at various times as Letitia, Bear Hill, and Bear Creek, is just north of Interstate Highway 10 on the outskirts of Houston in western Harris County. It was the railroad stop for the Bear Creek community, which was established around 1850 by German immigrants who homesteaded along Bear, Langham, and South Mayde creeks. The town was named after its first postmaster, Henry Addicks, in 1884. In 1891, when the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railroad was built, the town became a commercial center for local farmers and ranchers. Both the Bear Creek community and the town of Addicks were destroyed in the Galveston hurricane of 1900. The community rebuilt and listed a population of forty in 1925. The Bear Creek German Methodist Church, founded in 1879, continued in 1989 as the Addicks United Methodist Church, although it quit conducting services in German during World War I. Addicks Bear Creek Cemetery, located at the intersection of State Highway 6 and Patterson Road, contains the graves of the descendants of many of the original German settlers. Addicks had a population of 200 when the site was covered with water in the mid-1940s by the Addicks Dam Reservoir, built to protect nearby Houston from floods. By 1947 forty homes and buildings had been moved or destroyed, and the residents had been required to resettle under the auspices of the Federal Flood Control Project. The relocated town, a suburb of Houston, had a population of 150 in 1988.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Margaret Ann Howard and Martha Doty Freeman, Inventory and Assessment of Cultural Resources at Bear Creek Park, Addicks Reservoir (Austin: Prewitt and Associates, 1983).

Margaret Hopkins Edwards

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Margaret Hopkins Edwards, "ADDICKS, TX," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/hla04), accessed July 10, 2014. Uploaded on June 9, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.