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MONTGOMERY INSTITUTE

MONTGOMERY INSTITUTE. The Montgomery Institute, a girls' school, was established in Seguin in 1878 by Robert W. B. Elliott, a bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church. It was named for the Rev. Henry E. Montgomery of New York, with whom Elliott had worked while attending seminary. The school was too small to house many boarding students, and because it was located in a fairly small town, it was unable to attract enough day students to offset expenses. James Steptoe Johnston, who became bishop after Elliott's death in 1887, consolidated the school with St. Mary's Hall in San Antonio. The building was sold to Charles E. Tips and converted into a residence in the late 1880s.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 
Lawrence L. Brown, A Brief History of the Church in West Texas (Austin: Episcopal Seminary of the Southwest, 1959). Arwerd Max Moellering, A History of Guadalupe County, Texas (M.A. thesis, University of Texas, 1938).
Vivian Elizabeth Smyrl

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The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Handbook of Texas Online, Vivian Elizabeth Smyrl, "Montgomery Institute," accessed July 26, 2016, http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/kbm29.

Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.