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BURGENTINE CREEK

BURGENTINE CREEK. Burgentine Creek rises two miles south of Austwell in eastern Refugio County (at 28°22' N, 96°52' W) and runs southwest for four miles, through the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge, to its mouth, on St. Charles Bay in northern Aransas County (at 28°16' N, 96°55' W). The name, also variously spelled Bergantin, Vergantine, and Brigatine, is supposed to have been given to the stream because a Spanish barkentine, carrying the payroll for the Mexican garrisons at Bexar and Goliad, was caught in a storm and driven up from Aransas Bay to St. Charles Bay and up the stream. The vessel was supposedly left stranded in the prairie, where it was later found by colonists who used the metal and timber in building homes and constructing implements. Early Spanish records refer to present Goose Island as Isla de Bergantin and to St. Charles Bay as El Bergantin. The surrounding flat, marshy terrain is surfaced by dark clays that support mesquite, cacti, and grasses.

Hobart Huson

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The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Handbook of Texas Online, Hobart Huson, "Burgentine Creek," accessed September 25, 2016, http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/rbbba.

Uploaded on June 12, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.