TSHA Community

Great publications from our members and award recipients.

These books were authored by members of TSHA or received one of TSHA’s book awards. They are provided here for reference and support of the historical content they contain.


List of Publications (126 total) Page 9 of 11

Red Scare: Right-wing Hysteria, Fifties Fanaticism, and Their Legacy in Texas

Winner of the Texas State Historical Association Coral Horton Tullis Memorial Prize for Best Book on Texas History, this authoritative study of red-baiting in Texas reveals that what began as a coalition against communism became a fierce power struggle between conservative and liberal politics.

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Jefferson and Southwestern Exploration: The Freeman and Custis Accounts of the Red River Expedition of 1806

The complete story of a scientific expedition planned by President Thomas Jefferson to reconnoiter the recently purchased Louisiana Territory by ascending the Red River to its supposed sources n the mountains near Santa Fe, then traveling overland to the Arkansas River and down that stream to civilization.

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Lone Stars and State Gazettes

Uncommon men spread the uncommon news of Texas. From the time a press first reached Texas in 1813 until the Civil War, some four hundred newspapers appeared to chronicle the development of a nation, then a state. Most were propaganda or special-purpose sheets that allowed their owners to support or oppose the day’s leading figures–including Mirabeau B. Lamar and Sam Houston–or causes–the Texan Revolution, annexation, Know-Nothingism, secession. A few papers brought the higher standards of journalism to Texas and preserve, through their reports and comments, much of the history they also influenced.

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Ashbel Smith of Texas

Though three times burned in effigy for his political activities, Ashbel Smith was an admired and influential leader in nineteenth-century Texas. A doctor educated at Yale and abroad, the "father of Texas medicine" championed higher standards of medical practice and helped found the state's medical society. He worked persistently to establish free public education in Texas and in his later years led the way in founding Prairie View State Normal School, the University of Texas (which he also served as regent), and the university's medical school at Galveston.

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Marvin Jones: The Public Life of an Agrarian Advocate

Son of a north Texas wheat- and cotton-farming family, Marvin Jones grew up with strong agrarian roots and a taste for Democratic politics. Elected to Congress in 1916, he joined the Texas delegation and learned the political ropes from John Nance Garner. Named to the House Agriculture Committee, Jones later became its chairman and directed the destiny of New Deal agricultural legislation in the House of Representatives.

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The First Polish Americans: Silesian Settlements in Texas

This award-winning history was the first to provide a detailed and well-documented account of the first organized Polish immigrant communities in America. Author T. Lindsay Baker, who conducted some of his research while a Fulbright lecturer at the Technical University of Wrocaw, tells the story of the settlements founded in Texas in the mid-1850s.

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Texas Log Buildings: A Folk Architecture

Once too numerous to attract attention, the log buildings of Texas now stand out for their rustic beauty. This book preserves a record of the log houses, stores, inns, churches, schools, jails, and barns that have already become all too few in the Texas countryside. Terry Jordan explores the use of log buildings among several different Texas cultural groups and traces their construction techniques from their European and eastern American origins.

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The Big Bend, A History of the Last Texas Frontier

Since it first appeared in print twenty years ago, Ron C. Tyler's The Big Bend: A History of the Last Texas Frontier has become a classic. Not only does it tell the fascinating social and economic history of the region from the time of the Spanish explorers through its designation as a national park in the 1970s, but it also serves as an interesting background guide to this increasingly popular region.

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