TSHA Press

Publishing books on Texas history since 1918.

TSHA is the state’s longest-running publisher of books on Texas history, having published our first volume in 1918. Through the years, we have established a reputation as a publisher of high-quality, award-winning books on a wide variety of topics, including exploration, biography, architecture, historic sites, high school football, labor unions, and suburbanization. All lovers of Texas's rich pasts will find something to enjoy among our books.

List of Publications (107 total) Page 7 of 9

Tejano Epic: Essays in Honor of Félix D. Almaráz, Jr

Every now and then a scholar appears in the field of history whose outpouring of works earns them special tribute and homage. Such a person is Dr. Félix D. Almaráz Jr., of the University of Texas at San Antonio. Over the course of a career that spans more than four decades, don Félix (as he is respectfully known) has stamped his name on Texas history as an author of award-winning books and essays, as an ambassador for the profession, and as a winner of numerous awards and honors, many of them bestowed upon him by historical and learned societies abroad.Tejano Epic is a tribute to don Félix, compiled to recognize his outstanding service on behalf of Texas history in general and the state’s Hispanic past in particular. All the contributors are well-known scholars in the field of Tejano history; all have been touched by Dr. Almaráz’s exemplary scholarship, warm friendship, and consummate professionalism. The essays have a student readership in mind, each showing the historian at work: debunking stereotypes, revising the historical record, revisiting old events through new perspectives, engaging in archival detective work, or studying neglected topics in Tejano history. They are also suitable for teachers and general readers who want to know more about contributions and influences of the Mexican-origin people in Texas.

Read More »

By Arnoldo de León

Available for purchase at Legacy of Texas .

Texas Almanac 2018-2019

The Texas Almanac 2018–2019 includes these new feature articles:WATER — An in-depth overview of the state of water in Texas, written by conservationist Dr. Andrew Sansom. Author of the acclaimed book Water in Texas, Dr. Sansom provides compelling new information in this Almanac article. A former executive director of both the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and the Texas Nature Conservancy, he has won many awards for managing and protecting natural resources and currently is Research Professor of Geography and Executive Director of The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment at Texas State University.   “No natural resource has greater significance for the future of Texas than water.  In Texas, the population is expected to essentially double in the next generation and yet we have already given permission for more water to be drawn from many of our rivers than is actually in them."  HUNTING — A look at the popularity of hunting in Texas by Luke Clayton, a longtime outdoors writer, radio host, and book author. Clayton, who grew up hunting and fishing in rural northeast Texas, also discusses the overpopulation problem of wild hogs and provides his favorite recipes for all types of wild game. A prolific voice for hunters, Clayton hosts three weekly outdoors radio shows, writes a weekly hunting and fishing column that appears in more than 30 newspapers, and writes for magazines, such as Texas Parks & Wildlife magazine and Texas Wildlife.   “After spending about 55 years in the pursuit of fish and game all over this country and several others, I have come to the conclusion that some people are born to hunt and some are not, but that spark of DNA passed down through the eons from our hunting forefathers is alive in all of us."   SPORTSWOMEN — Cookbook author and food editor Dotty Griffith writes about women who love both hunting and fishing, and she offers up a few of her favorite recipes.   “I grew up in a hunting and fishing family. Not every woman is that lucky but that's no reason not to learn how. More women are getting into outdoor sports on their own, not as tag-alongs. From equipment to fashion, women are becoming a force in what used to be almost exclusively a man's world." FISHING — Fishing guide and expert Kevin “K.T." Townsend writes about angling in Texas. Townsend is the author of the online blog K.T. Diaries and gives an overview of both saltwater and freshwater fishing from the Gulf Coast to the state’s many rivers, lakes, and reservoirs.   “I can still remember fishing with my grandfather, who became a guide after taking early retirement. He would put me in the front of his john boat with a cane pole… It seemed like we filled up the fish basket on every trip."MAJOR SECTIONS UPDATED FOR EACH EDITION   An illustrated History of the Lone Star State.  The Environment, including geology, plant life, wildlife, rivers, lakes. Weather highlights of the previous two years, plus a list of destructive weather dating from 1766. Two-year Astronomical Calendar showing moon phases, sunrise and sunset, moonrise and moonset, eclipses, and meteor showers. Recreation, with details on state and national parks, landmarks, and wildlife refuges. Sports, including lists of high school football and basketball champions, professional sports teams, Texas Olympians, and Texas Sports Hall of Fame inductees. Counties, an expansive section featuring detailed county maps, locator maps, and profiles of Texas’ 254 counties. Population figures and the latest estimates from the State Data Center. Comprehensive list of Texas cities and towns. Politics, Elections, and information on Federal, State, and Local governments. Culture and the Arts, including a list of civic and religious Holidays. Health and Science, with charts of vital statistics. Education, including a complete list of colleges and universities, and UIL results. Business and Transportation, with an expanded section on Oil and Gas. Agriculture, including data on production of crops, fruits, vegetables, livestock, and dairy. Obituaries of notable Texans. A Pronunciation Guide to Texas town and county names.

Read More »

Texas and the Mexican War: A History and a Guide

Written for both the specialist and the casual reader, Texas and the Mexican War discusses the pivotal role Texas played in the Mexican War, battles fought on Texas soil, and the contributions--for better or sometimes worse--of Texas troops throughout the war.Since the opening of hostilities in 1846, the Mexican War has remained controversial. Author Charles M. Robinson III describes how attitudes of the era were influenced by sectional, political, and social differences, and, in recent times, by comparison to conflicts such as Vietnam. Robinson draws on U.S. and Mexican sources to discuss conditions in both countries that he believes made the war inevitable.Besides examining the political and military differences, he reveals the motivations, egos, pettiness, and quarrels of the various generals and politicians in the United States and Mexico. He also looks at how the common soldier saw the war. The extensive citations include commentaries on the historiography of the war. The book is profusely illustrated with contemporary photographs, sketches, and drawings, many from the author’s own collection.Besides an account of the war itself, sidebars throughout the book titled "Then and Now" serve as a guide for those who want to visit important Mexican War sites in Texas, northern Mexico, and Louisiana.

Read More »

By Charles M. Robinson III

Available for purchase at Legacy of Texas .

Texas, Her Texas: The Life and Times of Frances Goff

Texas, Her Texas is the fascinating story of Frances Goff and her three remarkable careers: in Texas government as legislative aide and State Budget Director; at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center; and as Director of the Bluebonnet Girls State Program of the American Legion Auxiliary. Based on Goff’s personal papers and interviews with those who knew her, including former Texas Governor Ann Richards, the book provides inside glimpses of such leaders in state politics as Coke Stevenson, Allan Shivers, and Richards herself. The fast-paced narrative also describes the founding and early years of M. D. Anderson and Goff’s key role as an aide to Dr. R. Lee Clark in building this world-renowned cancer treatment facility.At the core of the book is the Bluebonnet Girls State Program, an annual citizenship session for young Texas women that Goff directed for four decades. More than twenty thousand high school girls experienced Goff’s charismatic leadership and took to heart her message of public service and involvement. In turn, they became part of Goff’s statewide network. Texas, Her Texas makes a major contribution to a better understanding of how this voluntary women’s group is shaping present-day Texas.Frances Goff was a people person, and it is the portraits of those whose lives she touched that make this book so readable. From her youthful days in Kenedy to the corridors of the Texas Capitol, Goff knew the movers and shakers of Texas--Barbara Jordan, Lyndon Johnson, George Bush, Jack Cox, and Lloyd Bentsen, to name just a few--and became one herself. Goff’s biography will inspire those who knew her and those who are learning about her for the first time. She was, says Ann Richards, a "grand lionness of a woman," and Texas, Her Texas is her story.Number Six: Barker Texas History Center Series

Read More »

By Lewis L. Gould and Nancy Young

Available for purchase at Legacy of Texas .

The Battle of San Jacinto

Part of the inscription on the base of the San Jacinto Monument reads: "Measured by its results, San Jacinto was one of the decisive battles of the world." James W. Pohl, a noted military historian, tells the exciting story of the pivotal battle of the Texas Revolution.

Read More »

By James W. Pohl

Available for purchase at Legacy of Texas .

The Battle of the Alamo

The dramatic story of one of the most famous events in Texas history is told by Ben H. Procter. Procter describes in colorful detail the background, character, and motives of the prominent figures at the Alamo—Bowie, Travis, and Crockett—and the course and outcome of the battle itself. This concise and engaging account of a turning point in Texas history will appeal to students, teachers, historians, and general readers alike.

Read More »

By Ben H. Procter

Available for purchase at Legacy of Texas .

The Cartwrights of San Augustine: Three Generations of Agricultural Entrepreneurs in Nineteenth-Century Texas

The Cartwright family created a truly Texas-sized empire over the course of the nineteenth century. The highly readable history of this remarkable entrepreneurial family provides a unique and important view of the Texas experience.

Read More »

By Margaret S. Henson and Deoloce Parmalee

Available for purchase at Legacy of Texas .

The Great Hanging at Gainesville, 1862: The Accounts of Thomas Barrett and George Washington Diamond

In what may have been the single largest outbreak of vigilante violence in American history, forty suspected Unionists were hanged at Gainesville, Texas, in October 1862. Civil War tensions had been running high. The Cooke County community located just across the Red River from Indian Territory was split between natives of the Deep South who often supported the Confederacy and natives of the Upper South and Midwest who were sometimes indifferent or hostile to it. When active resistance to conscription into the Confederate army combined with long-running rumors of an invasion of North Texas by Kansas Jayhawkers and their Indian allies, many of the former decided action must be taken. More than 150 suspected Unionists were arrested and put before a “citizen’s court" of twelve jurors. The trial was marked by acrimony and violence, which included the lynching of fourteen men by an angry mob. Minister Thomas C. Barrett served on that jury and attempted to mitigate the vengeful rage of his neighbors. He had some success in the matter, but after two high-profile assassinations, the hangings continued. His 1885 memoir of the trial and the hangings is collected in this volume. Also collected here is the account based on records of the citizen’s court completed in 1876 by George Washington Diamond, whose brother, James J. Diamond, helped organize the trial. Placed together in one volume, these writings offer important insight into the tensions that tore apart American communities during the Civil War era. Renowned Civil War historian Richard B. McCaslin provides an introduction, while L. D. Clark, a descendant of one of the men hanged, reveals the extent to which tensions remain in Gainesville even generations later.

Read More »

By George Washington Diamond and Thomas Barrett

Available for purchase at Legacy of Texas .

The Handbook of Texas Music: First Edition

Texas Music was born at the crossroads of America. And it has reached out from there to touch the world. Texas has been a remarkably fertile seedbed for music coming from every point of the compass, and few places on any continent have produced musical styles and musicians whose artistic and cultural impact have been so profound on a national and international scale. Name virtually any style of music and there is a Texas musician whose popularity and influence have been enormous and pivotal in that genre—from the ragtime of Scott Joplin to the Tejano music of Selena, the electrifying blues guitar of T-Bone Walker to the distinctive country vocal styling of Willie Nelson, the bluesy wail of rocker Janis Joplin to the frantic rockabilly drive of Buddy Holly and the subtle piano jazz of Teddy Wilson. The Handbook of Texas Music documents all of these and many more. It is a comprehensive, authoritative source on Texas music—an encyclopedia and biographical dictionary that covers all aspects of Texas music, including over 125 striking illustrations of performers and musical artifacts.For centuries Texas has been a musical and cultural crossroads, and the Handbook of Texas Music carefully documents the complex convergence of numerous musical and cultural traditions in this state where east meets west, southern plantations meet high plains ranches, and where an ethnically diverse American culture shares an international border with Mexico. The music of American Indians, Anglo-Americans, African Americans, Mexican Americans, and numerous immigrant groups—Germans, Czechs, Cajuns, among many others—was brought to Texas from every direction. These groups crossed paths, and for centuries have been swapping songs and styles ranging from ancient fiddle tunes to lively polkas and boogie-woogie piano stomps. The stories of Texas music are as powerful as the music itself, and the Handbook of Texas Music tells those stories well.

Read More »

The McFaddin-Ward House

The McFaddin-Ward House, home to the prominent McFaddin family, was built in 1906 in the prestigious neighborhood around Calder Avenue. This entertaining volume tells the story of this house and the people who lived in it, bringing out the personalities of the principal inhabitants--W. P. H. McFaddin, his second wife Ida, their daughter Mamie, and Mamie's husband Carroll Ward.

Read More »

By Jessica Foy and Judith Walker Linsley

Available for purchase at Legacy of Texas .

The Methodist Hospital of Houston: Serving the World

This fascinating book traces Methodist's transformation from a community institution into an internationally renowned hospital equipped for heart-lung transplants. Opened in 1924, its history reflects the most revolutionary era in medicine. Methodist grew to meet the challenge and to stay on the cutting edge of a new era in medicine that included atomic medicine, high technology, and organ transplants.

Read More »

By Marilyn McAdams Sibley

Available for purchase at Legacy of Texas .

The Old Army in the Big Bend of Texas: The Last Cavalry Frontier, 1911-1921

Listen to author Ty Smith discuss this book on TPR’s “Texas Matters” radio program broadcast June 4, 2018.Even before Pancho Villa’s 1916 raid on Columbus, New Mexico, and the following punitive expedition under General John J. Pershing, the U.S. Army was strengthening its presence on the southwestern border in response to the Mexican Revolution of 1910. Manning forty-one small outposts along a three-hundred mile stretch of the Rio Grande region, the army remained for a decade, rotating eighteen different regiments, primarily cavalry, until the return of relative calm. The remote, rugged, and desolate terrain of the Big Bend defied even the technological advances of World War I, and it remained very much a cavalry and pack mule operation until the outposts were finally withdrawn in 1921.With The Old Army in the Big Bend of Texas: The Last Cavalry Frontier, 1911–1921, Thomas T. “Ty" Smith, one of Texas’s leading military historians, has delved deep into the records of the U.S. Army to provide an authoritative portrait, richly complemented by many photos published here for the first time, of the final era of soldiers on horseback in the American West.THOMAS T. SMITH, Col. (Ret.) U.S. Army, of San Antonio is the author of The U.S. Army and the Texas Frontier Economy, 1845–1900 (Texas A&M University Press, 1999) and The Old Army in Texas: A Research Guide to the U.S. Army in Nineteenth-Century Texas (Texas State Historical Association, 2000). He is a Fellow of the Texas State Historical Association.

Read More »

By Thomas T. Smith

Available for purchase at Legacy of Texas .