TSHA Press

Publishing books on Texas history since 1918.

TSHA is the state’s longest-running publisher of books on Texas history, having published our first volume in 1918. Through the years, we have established a reputation as a publisher of high-quality, award-winning books on a wide variety of topics, including exploration, biography, architecture, historic sites, high school football, labor unions, and suburbanization. All lovers of Texas's rich pasts will find something to enjoy among our books.

List of Publications (109 total) Page 8 of 10

The Methodist Hospital of Houston: Serving the World

This fascinating book traces Methodist's transformation from a community institution into an internationally renowned hospital equipped for heart-lung transplants. Opened in 1924, its history reflects the most revolutionary era in medicine. Methodist grew to meet the challenge and to stay on the cutting edge of a new era in medicine that included atomic medicine, high technology, and organ transplants.

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By Marilyn McAdams Sibley

Available for purchase at Legacy of Texas .

The Old Army in the Big Bend of Texas: The Last Cavalry Frontier, 1911-1921

Listen to author Ty Smith discuss this book on TPR’s “Texas Matters” radio program broadcast June 4, 2018.Even before Pancho Villa’s 1916 raid on Columbus, New Mexico, and the following punitive expedition under General John J. Pershing, the U.S. Army was strengthening its presence on the southwestern border in response to the Mexican Revolution of 1910. Manning forty-one small outposts along a three-hundred mile stretch of the Rio Grande region, the army remained for a decade, rotating eighteen different regiments, primarily cavalry, until the return of relative calm. The remote, rugged, and desolate terrain of the Big Bend defied even the technological advances of World War I, and it remained very much a cavalry and pack mule operation until the outposts were finally withdrawn in 1921.With The Old Army in the Big Bend of Texas: The Last Cavalry Frontier, 1911–1921, Thomas T. “Ty" Smith, one of Texas’s leading military historians, has delved deep into the records of the U.S. Army to provide an authoritative portrait, richly complemented by many photos published here for the first time, of the final era of soldiers on horseback in the American West.THOMAS T. SMITH, Col. (Ret.) U.S. Army, of San Antonio is the author of The U.S. Army and the Texas Frontier Economy, 1845–1900 (Texas A&M University Press, 1999) and The Old Army in Texas: A Research Guide to the U.S. Army in Nineteenth-Century Texas (Texas State Historical Association, 2000). He is a Fellow of the Texas State Historical Association.

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By Thomas T. Smith

Available for purchase at Legacy of Texas .

The Reminiscences of Major General Zenas R. Bliss, 1854-1876: From the Texas Frontier to the Civil War and Back Again

The "Reminiscences" of Maj. Gen. Zenas R. Bliss are a remarkably detailed account of his army service in Texas before and after the Civil War. Many scholars consider Bliss's recollections to be one of the best from a soldier of the "Old Army." It has become a staple primary resource for Texas frontier research for the last three decades.Bliss's memoirs serve as a rare and important window into Texas' military, political, cultural, and geographical history. The memoirs cover Bliss's graduation at West Point in 1854, his antebellum service at Fort Duncan, Camp Hudson, and Fort Davis, as well as his return to the Texas frontier in 1870, and end with his duties at Fort Davis in 1876. Details also describe his capture by Texas Confederate forces in 1861, his tribulations as a prisoner of war, and his subsequent Civil War experiences as a Union regimental commander at Fredericksburg, Vicksburg, and Petersburg, where he was at the battle of the Crater. For gallantry at Fredericksburg, he received the Congressional Medal of Honor.While commanding buffalo soldiers at Fort Duncan in 1870, Bliss conceived the idea of enlisting Seminole-Negro Indians from Mexico as army scouts. After successfully lobbying the departmental commander and the War Department for approval, Bliss formed the first band of Seminole-Negro Indian Scouts in August of 1870. The unit served the army with extraordinary devotion and distinction until 1912.Bliss served in Texas longer than any other army officer (twenty-three years) and rose in rank from second lieutenant to departmental commander. Possessing a keen sense of humor, an eye for detail, and a boisterous social nature, his lively account of the people and places of the antebellum and post-Civil War Texas frontier is among the very best of Texas history.

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The Samuel May Williams Home: The Life and Neighborhood of an Early Galveston Entrepreneur

Built in the winter of 1839-1840, this house, and the Texas pioneer who inhabited it, are the central focus of this thoroughly researched and well-written study of Galveston's merchant elite—Gail Borden, Michel Menard, Thomas McKinney, and others—a generation of leaders who did much to shape their city and Texas itself.

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By Deoloce Parmalee and Margaret S. Henson

Available for purchase at Legacy of Texas .

The Texas Republic: A Social and Economic History

In 1946 historian William Ransom Hogan, then a professor at the University of Oklahoma, published The Texas Republic: A Social and Economic History. The book became an instant classic of Texas historical literature. In an era when scholarly writing on Texas history still gave disproportionate emphasis to military and political history and "great men," this book emphasized the lives of ordinary people as well as of the legendary figures of the Republic period.Hogan knew how to be a "revisionist" in the best sense of the term, offering up fresh interpretations that, as he put it, challenged the "pleasant myth" of "heroic" Texas history. Yet he also managed to balance his revisionism with an acknowledgment that the Republic era did indeed embody much that was heroic, even legendary.Naturally The Texas Republic is a product of its time. If written today, it would undoubtedly pay more attention to African Americans and Tejanos, for example. But whatever shortcomings the book may have in the eyes of modern readers, even those shortcomings make the book valuable in the college classroom, because they serve as important points of discussion for students and professors.

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Available for purchase at Legacy of Texas .

The Texas State Capitol: Selected Essays from the Southwestern Historical Quarterly

Through its majestic form and monumental style, the Texas State Capitol (erected 1882-1888) reflects the pride of Texas citizens in the culture and government of their state. Now, as we celebrate the restoration of the century-old structure and the completion of a stately new underground wing, a team of specialists in architecture, decorative arts, art history, landscaping, and labor history helps us reflect upon the history and significance of the Capitol and the American practice of commemorating democratic government in grand public buildings. Each chapter in this informative book covers a different facet of the Capitol's history, making it clear that only through the dedicated commitment of our elected officials was one of the finest statehouses of the late nineteenth century completed. The chapters are selected from the Southwestern Historical Quarterly, which won a certificate of commendation from the American Association for State and Local History for its Capitol centennial issue in 1988.

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Available for purchase at Legacy of Texas .

Valor Across the Lone Star: The Congressional Medal of Honor in Frontier Texas

The Medal of Honor is the highest award for valor in action against an enemy force that can be bestowed upon an individual serving in the armed services of the United States. While a formal system for recognizing acts of individual gallantry dates back to the American Revolution, it was not until the Civil War that a medal for rewarding bravery received wide-scale recognition. The Congressional Medal of Honor, referred to as such because the president of the United States presents it in the name of Congress, was first awarded in 1863.In Valor Across the Lone Star, Charles M. Neal Jr., takes us back to the Texas frontier during the years of the Civil War and the Indian wars. Most of these Medal of Honor recipients were not native Texans but a diverse lot of individuals from across the United States and around the world.Union sailor George Bell, although wounded in an assault on the CSS Royal Yacht in Galveston Bay, forced his fleeing crewmembers to return their launch to the ship to rescue other sailors, then guided the launch away from the scene to safety. . . . Pvt. George W. Smith, who, though gravely wounded in an Indian battle, fired his pistol until he was no longer able to, then begged his fellow soldiers to use his body as a shield.Neal's colorful narrative brings great detail and understanding to these stories of conflict and heroism in Texas in the last half of the nineteenth century. He has, in the words of noted historian Jerry Thompson, "produced an excellent survey of brave and exemplary men." This reliable and engaging volume makes an important contribution to our understanding of the Texas military frontier. It includes several appendices that list all Texas recipients from the Civil War to the present, their burial sites around the world, the locations of their deeds, and other statistics.

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By Charles M. Neal

Available for purchase at Legacy of Texas .

William Pitt Ballinger: Texas Lawyer, Southern Statesman, 1825–1888

Few people have played a more important role in the history of Texas than William Pitt Ballinger. Though not as well known as legendary figures Stephen F. Austin or Sam Houston, Ballinger is one of those individuals whose behind-the-scenes life had a major impact on the events of his time. This thoroughly researched and engagingly written biography brings Ballinger to life as one of the most complete men of his time: lawyer, soldier, public servant, civic leader, author, editorialist, naturalist, education reformer, and bibliophile.In his long and illustrious career as a lawyer, Ballinger was usually the picture of calm and confidence, but on the morning of April 21, 1881, he found it difficult to maintain his composure as he awaited a conference with Jay Gould, the legendary “robber baron" of the Gilded Age, who had written Ballinger just six days earlier “to obtain the best legal advice I can."

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By John Moretta

Available for purchase at Legacy of Texas .

Women and Texas History: Selected Essays

Women have long made significant contributions to Texas history. Only in recent years, however, has their part in that history begun to be told. The great strides made in Texas women's studies are reflected in this important new book of essays about women and their many roles in the history of our state.In October 1990, the Texas State Historical Association sponsored a conference, "Women and Texas History," which brought together some of the leading scholars in the field of women's studies. This highly successful conference — attended by hundreds and awarded recognition for its excellence by the AASLH — produced a raft of exciting presentations which demonstrated the vigorous quality and growth of women's studies in and about Texas. Women and Texas History includes thirteen of the best presentations at the conference. This "milestone" publication, notes Fane Downs in her introduction to Women and Texas History, represents "the emerging maturity of the field of Texas womens history; moreover, these essays add significantly to our knowledge of the complex and diverse history of Texas." This ground-breaking volume will be of interest to students, scholars, and general readers, and is well adapted to classroom use.Publication of this book was made possible in part by grants from the RGK Foundation of Austin and the Texas Committee for the Humanities, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities. 

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By Fane Downs and Nancy Baker Jones, Ph.D.

Available for purchase at Legacy of Texas .

Women in Early Texas

First published by the Jenkins Publishing Company in 1975 and long out of print, Women in Early Texas is now available again with a new scholarly introduction by award-winning Texas historian Debbie Mauldin Cottrell.The volume contains biographies of fifty notable women whose lives deeply influenced the way Texas developed. Many of the biographies were written by descendants of the women and have been extensively researched and supplemented by heretofore unused family records and papers. The stories of these inspiring women are fine examples of local history and will be of interest to scholars doing research, teachers seeking classroom material, and general readers looking for stories of women out of Texas' past. Debbie Mauldin Cottrells introduction places this groundbreaking book and these diverse women in historical perspective, and provides an excellent bibliography of other sources for researchers and readers.Publication of this book was made possible in part by a grant from the American Association of University Women--Austin Branch.

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By Evelyn M. Carrington

Available for purchase at Legacy of Texas .

Abner Cook: Master Builder on the Texas Frontier

Abner Cook has long been acknowledged as the most important architect in antebellum Texas, but this extensively illustrated volume is the first to document fully his life and works. This well-told history of Cook's life also presents a vivid account of his city--nineteenth-century Austin.

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By Kenneth Hafertepe

Available for purchase at Legacy of Texas .

Biracial Unions on Galveston's Waterfront, 1865-1925

In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, a tradition of biracial unionism sprang up among waterfront workers along the Gulf Coast. Galveston’s waterfront workers formed some of Texas’ earliest and strongest labor organizations in an era when the city was a leading seaport and the most important commercial center in Texas.Foremost among these workers were the white cotton screwmen, whose skill and economic importance in the loading of cotton enabled them to control the labor supply as well as wages and working conditions. As the importance of cotton screwing declined in the 1890s, white and black union leaders, if not all rank-and-file members, began to recognize the advantages of biracial unionism at a time when southern states began to enact Jim Crow laws.This history of a particular laboring community studies black and white workers’ consciousness and how the conflicts between race and class were worked out in practice, adding to our knowledge of race and the labor movement, the course of biracial unionism in the South, and Texas labor history.

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By Clifford Farrington

Available for purchase at Legacy of Texas .