TSHA Press

Publishing books on Texas history since 1918.

TSHA is the state’s longest-running publisher of books on Texas history, having published our first volume in 1918. Through the years, we have established a reputation as a publisher of high-quality, award-winning books on a wide variety of topics, including exploration, biography, architecture, historic sites, high school football, labor unions, and suburbanization. All lovers of Texas's rich pasts will find something to enjoy among our books.

List of Publications (109 total) Page 9 of 10

Eugene C. Barker: Historian

Eugene C. Barker, one of the most influential historians to teach at the University of Texas, has been described as "a granite monolith," "half sabre-toothed tiger and half St. Francis of Assisi," with "a mind like a surgeon's scalpel." The late William C. Pool, Barker's former student, presents a vivid portrait of Barker from knowledge-hungry youth to administrator, professor, leader, author, and historian.

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By William C. Pool

Available for purchase at Legacy of Texas .

Imaginary Kingdom: Texas as Seen by the Rivera and Rubi Military Expeditions, 1727 and 1767

The diaries of Pedro de Rivera and the Marques de Rubí, written in the eighteenth century during inspections of the far northern frontier of New Spain, are crucial documents for studying and understanding the Spanish presence on the frontier of what would one day be Texas. Rivera's diary, previously unavailable in English translation, and the heretofore unknown Rubí diary are both presented here, carefully placed in historical context by Jackson and Foster. Because of Spain's tenuous hold on the distant frontier, Rubí and Rivera saw it as an imaginary possession—the king's domain in name only. No other military visits to the frontier in this era rivaled those of Rivera and Rubí in scope, organization, or execution. They were significant fact-finding commissions, authorized by the Spanish king, that resulted in extensive reports, broad recommendations, and tangible changes in military regulations for the presidios on the far northern frontier. To understand Texas and its adjacent provinces at this formative time, students and scholars of the Borderlands must examine the records left by these two military expeditions. These remarkable documents contain fascinating insights into the early Spanish road systems, the early towns and missions, the Indians, and the flora and fauna. Each diary has an introduction, and detailed route maps and annotations are provided. Following the diaries and related documents, each inspection is assessed in depth. These two diaries, and the editors' careful annotation and analysis, provide significant new material which will help further understanding of Spanish Texas, the people who inhabited it, and its influence on the Texas of today.

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By Jack Jackson

Available for purchase at Legacy of Texas .

New Lands, New Men: America and the Second Great Age of Discovery

In New Lands, New Men, the third volume in his award-winning Exploration Trilogy, one of America’s leading historians tells the dramatic story of three centuries of exploration that witnessed Europeans exploring the Pacific and Northwest, Americans setting out across their own immense continent, and finally, Americans exploring new worlds: the oceans, Japan, the polar regions.Spanning the seventeenth to the nineteenth centuries, the Second Great Age of Discovery was marked by the Enlightenment’s ideals of science and progress. Explorers from James Cook to George Catlin, from Charles Wilkes to Matthew Maury, trained as scientists intent on precise observation and gathered information that would transform natural history and botany into systematic inquiries, place geography and cartography on their modern footing, and launch the newer sciences of geology and oceanography. And the artists accompanying these explorers would have as tremendous an impact, their renditions of spectacular terrains, of customs and costumes of exotic tribes inspiring the birth of Romanticism.William H. Goetzmann writes in absorbing detail about the remarkable adventures of the explorers and the explosive rise of American science. America was truly exploration’s nation—a culture of endless possibilities, continually looking forward in the direction of the new. New Lands, New Men illuminates America’s rise to cultural and scientific prominence—and transforms our understanding of America’s role in world history.

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By William Goetzmann

Available for purchase at Legacy of Texas .

Scottish Capital on the American Credit Frontier

This is an unusual frontier epic, chronicling the West of credits and debits, collateral, and interest. Capital was one of the most needed commodities in Texas and the West, and Scottish financiers provided vital and massive amounts. W. G. Kerr brings to this economic history a voluminous knowledge of Anglo-Scottish financial activities in the U.S., capturing the capital, cattle, and properties, and the men who owned and managed them.

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By William G. Kerr

Available for purchase at Legacy of Texas .

Texas Oil, American Dreams: A Study of the Texas Independent Producers and Royalty Owners Association

In this intricately interpretive narrative, Lawrence Goodwyn explores the legend of the Texas wildcatter, the twentieth century's version of Thomas Jefferson's "yeoman farmer" and the nineteenth century's plains-riding cowboy. Goodwyn brings into clear relief the people who endeavored to act out the American Dream in the remote corners of "oil country." A driving force in American culture, the "American Dream," always difficult to define, nevertheless possesses one core quality: the thought that all citizens, regardless of the circumstances of their birth, enjoyed the opportunity to make something of themselves through their own efforts.Goodwyn looks at the notion of the American Dream through the eyes of the Texas wildcatter. Surprisingly, even before the outlines of the wildcatter come into focus, other vague but seemingly omnipotent actors occupy center stage: major oil companies. Indeed, the "independents" and the "majors" are found to be abrasively yoked in awkward embrace; what immediately becomes clear in this intimate study is that the presence of one helps in important ways to define the other. In fact, as Goodwyn perceptively shows, the relationship of individual enterprise to corporate enterprise becomes uniquely visible in the sources amassed over half a century by the Texas Independent Producers and Royalty Owners Association.This peculiar relationship also came about because of another component of the national experience: the American antimonopoly tradition. In compelling detail, Goodwyn shows precisely how the American antimonopoly tradition has historically been mobilized by Texas independents in a sustained effort over many decades to defend themselves against the forces of centralization that have always occupied a dominant position in global petroleum.Texas Oil, American Dreams has a magisterial quality whose ultimate meaning extends far beyond the borders of Texas because the enterprise of oil finding and the wildcatters who have lived it constitute one of the most intense expressions of individual American striving. Above all, they kept careful records of their own efforts-when they prevailed and why, and when they met defeat and why. In Goodwyn's own words: "In its implications about the driving imperatives of modern life, their story is not provincial. It speaks to everyone who respects the idea of autonomy and independence."

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Available for purchase at Legacy of Texas .

Travels with Joe: The Life Story of a Historian from Texas, 1917–1993

He once said, Texas is twelve million people who are bright and dumb, conservative and liberal, tall and short and slim and fat, courageous and cowardly;just like people in Connecticut and Oregon. And, The philosophy of the cowboy is not spoken, but tacit. It must remain what he was, not what he said. And, Academics everywhere are generally as rigid as rednecks, as conservative as successful farmers, and as irrational as zealots.Joe B. Frantz was noted for his entertaining talks, his love of anecdote, and his wit in phrase-making. He spent his life working as a college professor of history at the University of Texas at Austin and at Texas A&MCorpus Christi. He was director of the Texas State Historical Association from 1966 to 1977 and gathered the oral history of the Lyndon B. Johnson administration. Along the way he taught graduate students, wrote books and articles, and gave speeches. Joe, as he preferred to be called, received the mantle of Texas history from his mentor, Walter Prescott Webb, and progressed to become a recognized western and national historian. His era spanned the time when the University of Texas became a major doctoral school that trained research historians, and his students are now senior professors in departments across the country.This engagingly written biography of Frantz traces his lifetime from an orphan in Dallas until his death in Houston in 1993. Written by Texas historian David G. McComb, a former student of Frantz's, Travels with Joe is based upon Frantz's personal papers, interviews, and writings. It narrates the story of Frantz's triumphs and storms and captures the essence of this fascinating and influential man. Life, for Joe B. Frantz, was a grand journey, an adventure that he preferred to share with others. This book is about his journey.

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By David G. McComb

Available for purchase at Legacy of Texas .

Along Forgotten River: Photographs of Buffalo Bayou and the Houston Ship Channel, 1997—2001

For more than five years award-winning photographer Geoff Winningham explored and photographed Buffalo Bayou, the Houston Ship Channel, and the landscape he found along the way. As he hiked and canoed the course of this historic stream, he found pristine stretches of the bayou still untouched by the encroaching city of Houston. He also found areas where the forces of nature and those of the growing city seemed to struggle for supremacy. He revisited sites of historic importance, such as Allen’s Landing, where the city was founded in 1836, and the San Jacinto Battlefield, where Texas won its independence in the same year. In Along Forgotten River, Winningham has sequenced eighty of his striking, large-format black-and-white photographs, following Buffalo Bayou from its source in the Katy Prairie through the suburbs and into the inner city of Houston. From there, his stunning duotone photographs follow the bayou east to its confluence with the San Jacinto River, where it becomes the Houston Ship Channel, crosses Galveston Bay, and enters the Gulf of Mexico.As a counterpoint to his photographs, Winningham has edited and sequenced passages from the written accounts of the earliest travelers to this part of Texas. Impelled by dreams or curiosity, an incredibly diverse lot of travelers came along the roads and streams of Texas in the preceding centuries. There were Spanish friars and itinerant preachers, prospective settlers, refugees, adventurers, exiles, and naturalists.Some travelers came with their families, looking for a place to settle. Mrs. Dilue Harris was one of these who came to Texas in the early 1830s. In her "Reminiscences," she recalled a night on Buffalo Bayou: "We were surrounded by wolves and water. There was a large sycamore tree that stood in the water near us, and it was as white as snow. The buzzards roosted in it. We could hear owls hoot all night. Mother said it was a night of horrors. . . . She said the owls were singing a funeral dirge, and the wolves and buzzards were waiting to bury us. . . ."In Along Forgotten River, Winningham has selected passages from the writings of these and other early travelers and interwoven them with his remarkable and beautiful photographs. The result is a complex and fascinating interplay of pictures and words, of historical perspective and present-day observation.

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By Geoff Winningham

Available for purchase at Legacy of Texas .

Mexican Americans in Texas History, Selected Essays

The contributions and influences of Mexican Americans in Texas history have been many and significant. Only in recent decades, however, have historians adequately told this story. The enormous strides made in the study of Mexican-origin people in Texas are reflected in this important new book of essays.In May 1991 the Texas State Historical Association cosponsored a conference, “Mexican Americans in Texas History,” which brought together some six hundred participants, including nearly one hundred leading scholars in the field of Mexican American Studies. In the words of the editors’ introduction, this highly successful conference “confirmed and celebrated the existence of a substantial body of literature in Mexican American history.” It showed that “Mexican American history was on its way to assuming its rightful place of importance.”This groundbreaking volume, which contains eleven essays from that pivotal conference, corrects and amplifies the historical record. Mexican Americans in Texas History will be of great interest to students, scholars, teachers, and general readers, and it is well adapted to classroom use.Selected essays include:; Old Roads, New Horizons: Texas History and the New World Order, by David Montejano; Occupied Texas: Bexar and Goliad, 1835–;1836, by Paul Lack; Mexicanos in Texas During the Civil War, by Miguel González Quiroga; Union, Paz y Trabajo: Laredo’s Mexican Mutual Aid Societies in the 1890s, by Roberto R. Calderón; Mutualist and Mexicanist Expressions of a Mexican Political Culture in Texas, by Emilio Zamora; The Tejano Revolt of 1915, by Rodolfo Rocha; Agents of Americanization: The Houston Settlement Association and the Mexican Community, 1900–;1950, by María Cristina García; Trini Gamez and the Texas Farm Workers: Toil and Trouble on the Texas Plains, by Yolanda García Romero; Carlos E. Castañeda: The Historian and the Critics” by Félix D. Almaráz; The Borderlands of Culture: Americo Paredes’s George Washington Gomez, by Ramón Saldívar; Estudios Tejanos: A List of Historical Literature on Mexican Americans in Texas, by Arnoldo de Leon; Selected Bibliography on Mexican American, Tejana, and Tejano History, by Cynthia Orozco

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By Cynthia Orozco, Emilio Zamora, Rodolfo Rocha, and

Available for purchase at Legacy of Texas .

Check List of Texas Imprints, 1861-1876

With this companion volume to Winkler's great 1846-1860 checklist, the Check List of Texas Imprints became the most nearly complete listing ever published of material printed in Texas between 1846 and 1876. This enormous catalogue contains documentation on more than 3,900 Texas imprints produced between 1861 and 1876.

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By Ernest W. Winkler and Llerena B. Friend

Available for purchase at Legacy of Texas .

The Old Army in Texas: A Research Guide to the U.S. Army in Nineteenth Century Texas

In The Old Army in Texas, U.S. Army officer and historian Thomas "Ty" Smith presents a comprehensive and authoritative single-source reference for the activities of the regular army in the Lone Star State during the nineteenth century. Beginning with a series of maps that sketch the evolution of fort locations on the frontier, Smith furnishes an overview with his introductory essay, "U.S. Army Combat Operations in the Indian Wars of Texas, 1849–;1881." Reprinted from the Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Smith's essay breaks new ground in an innovative analysis of the characteristics of army tactical methods and the nature of combat on the Texas frontier, introducing a unique historical model and methodology to examine the army-Indians conflicts.The second part of this guide, "Commanders and Organization, Department of Texas, 1848–;1900," lists the departmental commanders, the location of the military headquarters, and the changes in the administrative organization and military titles for Texas.Part III, "U.S. Army Sites in Texas 1836–;1900," provides a dictionary of 223 posts, forts, and camps in the state. It is the most extensive inventory published to date, including essential information on all of the major forts, as well as dozens of obscure sites such as Camp Las Laxas, Camp Ricketts, and Camp Lugubrious. The fourth part, "Post Garrisons, 1836–;1900," gives a year by year snapshot of total army strength in the state, the regiments assigned, and the garrisons and commanders of each major fort and camp.Supplying the only such synopsis of its kind, the "Summary of U.S. Army Combat Actions in the Texas Indian Wars, 1849–;1881," the guide's Part V, offers a chronological description of 224 U.S. Army combat actions in the Indian Wars with vivid details of each engagement.The 900 entries in the selected bibliography of Part VI are divided topically into sections on biographical sources and regimental histories, histories of forts, garrison life, civil-military relations, the Mexican War, and frontier operations. In addition to being a helpful catalog of standard histories, there are two important and unusual aspects to the bibliography. It contains a complete range of primary source microfilm material from the National Archives, including the roll numbers of specific periods of forts and units; and secondly, the bibliography integrates nearly all of the published archeological reports into the section on fort histories.The Old Army in Texas is an indispensable reference and research tool for students, scholars, and military history aficionados. It will be of great value to those interested in Texas history, especially military history and local and regional studies. This superb reference work is illustrated with a number of maps and rare photographs of the U.S. Army in nineteenth century Texas.

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By Thomas T. Smith

Available for purchase at Legacy of Texas .

The Forgotten Texas Census: The First Annual Report of the Agricultural Bureau of the Department of Agriculture

A wide-angle portrait of Texas in the 1880s is typically a difficult picture to capture. But a unique government document of more than three hundred pages does it as well as our imagination will allow by providing the statistics and data to make it possible. In 1887, a state bureaucrat - Lafayette Lumpkin Foster - used his position as head of the Department of Agriculture, Insurance, Statistics, and History to create a compendium of wide-ranging information for Texans and people interested in Texas. It was a treasure trove then and even more so now for the modern reader and researcher. Open the pages of his First Annual Report of the Agricultural Bureau and you have a unique window into understanding the people, towns, counties, railroads, and farming experiences that made up late-nineteenth-century Texas. The Texas State Historical Association presents this document, out-of-print for more than one hundred and ten years, as the latest in its Fred H. and Ella Mae Moore Texas History Reprint Series.Rare for a document of its era, this agricultural report notes, in a county-by-county format, questions of gender, labor, and ethnicity not available anywhere else. What did female teachers earn compared to male teachers? How many hired laborers worked in the fields and what was their average length of employment? How many divorces and marriages took place in 1887 in Zapata County? What churches were represented? This report will provide the recorded answer, plus give the insightful researcher the ability to compare statistically one county with another. How many Norwegians, Mexicans, Germans, or Jews lived in each county? How many families were "white"? How many "colored"? Race, ethnicity, and gender are just a few categories to be explored by the person interested in describing the expansive, developing countryside of Texas in the final quarter of the nineteenth century.In addition to the county tallies, Foster and his bureau employees provided a forty-page overview of state institutions, mineral resources, geography, and miscellany. Their efforts included a series of tables marshaling the statistics into accessible form, while the report also included a letter by Commissioner Foster explaining why and how the report came to be. For the modern reader a contemporary introduction is provided, placing the report in its historical context and pointing to its unique existence and potential for researchers. With the goal of cutting state expenditures, a subsequent Texas legislature restricted the collection and publication of the kinds of information Foster wove into his survey. Thus, this 1887 Census of Texas is our best stop-camera picture of the state. It has been forgotten on dusty shelves behind a dull cover and title, but is now available as The Forgotten Texas Census.

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By Barbara J Rozek

Available for purchase at Legacy of Texas .

Texas Vistas (Third Edition)

For more than one hundred years some of the finest articles on the history of Texas have appeared in the Southwestern Historical Quarterly published by the Texas State Historical Association. The editors of the newest edition of this classic Texas history anthology have brought together eighteen essays (fifteen of which were published in the past two decades) that illustrate the rich diversity of Texas history, especially in the areas of gender and ethnic studies, and include the writings of some of today's most respected Texas historians. Like the previous editions, this book is designed for both the student and the general reader seeking an authoritative overview of Texas history. Includes contributions by: Donald E. Chipman, Patricia R. Lemée, Gregg Cantrell, Margaret Henson, Fane Downs, Randolph Campbell, Joleene Maddox Snider, Alwyn Barr, Carl H. Moneyhon, James D. Ivy, David L. Wheeler, Robert A. Calvert, William S. Osborn, Shelley Sallee, Roger Biles, Emilio Zamora ,Martin Kuhlman, and Terry J. Jordan.

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