The Texas Revolution


This video clip is part of the Texas Talks with Dr. Gregg Cantrell titled: Stephen F. Austin: Empresario of Texas. The Texas Revolution The first shots of the Texas Revolution are fired in Gonzales on October of 1836 and Santa Anna leads the Mexican Army into Texas in early 1836. Austin traveled to the United States with fellow commissioners William H. Wharton and Dr. Branch Archer from New Orleans, Louisville, and eventually Washington D.C. and New York City promoting the Texas cause through raising money and recruits. While in New York, Austin hears word back from Texas that the Texas army under Sam Houston defeated Santa Anna at the battle of San Jacinto and that Texas won its independence. Austin returned to Texas and ran to be its first president in a newly formed Republic but was defeated by Sam Houston who had eclipsed the former empressario in terms of popularity and influence. Houston, seeing Austin's value to Texas, appointed Austin to the office of Secretary of State in his first administration. However, Austin's tenure in this position was short-lived as he contracted pneumonia in December of 1836 and died at the age of 43. Sam Houston published his funeral announcement in Texas newspapers saying, "We perform the most painful duty in announcing the death of Stephen F. Austin who departed us yesterday. The patriarch has left us."
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Resource Type
Audio-Visual Materials
Source(s)
Texas State Historical Association

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